[Editor's note: The cover page of this document is a stylized drawing of the town plan. It is not accurate to the actual plan.] This proposal for development of rental housing is the first step in the program to create a well-planned town forgenteel living...an orderly, yet informal, area designed for the average American Family will arise from raw acreage...the enduring and the modern principles of town planning are blended to produce an integrated community of homes, shopping centers, schools and recreational facilities, and non-nuisance industry bound together by a road system distinguished for its safety and facility, public transportation of adequate dimensions, and a utility system to serve the population...all this will lend itself admirably to a healthy, self-governed town...

Here is the ideal combination of endless work opportunities in the teeming hub of the nation and an accessible, well-nigh self-sufficient open and green place to live and to rear a family...here, also, is the practical demonstration of the inter-relation of the home and the town's functional activities.

Above all, here is the proof that it is feasible and economically sound to create whole towns to serve man's desire for something more than mere shelter...

The physical pattern is presented in its principle features...the intangible values must be visualized...it has been the motivating aim to create a form which would permit open, neighborly living as a keystone to a better democracy...formal and stultified beauty has been abandoned...an informal and friendly harmony has been sought...

The objective, therefore, is:

A well planned, thoroughly livable town graced by an informal yet harmoniousatmosphere;

A place where people will breathe the wholesome spirit of democracy;

A demonstration that all this is within the orbit of the resources of free enterprise...

The cornerstone of the plan is the needs of the American Family. True, they constitute a ready market for homes, but that is only one phase of their needs...they yearn for outdoor living as well as inside comfort - together, they make a great market of consumers...in a well planned community, they should become a discriminating as well as stable market.

Meeting their housing and related needs creates positive values in commerce ...the combination of both should serve to make a better and sounder community...

These families will be ultimately housed in single-family dwellings, twin houses, town and country houses and apartments ...a wide variety of plans and amenities will offer the choice of the kind of shelter each family thinks most desirable and can afford...

Shopping facilities will be complete so that, with the exception of certain luxury items, all needs can be met within the area...the principal shopping district has been planned to attract buyers from outside of the community; additional neighborhood shops will be provided as needed.

The educational facilities are expected to follow the most modern trends in building...actual teaching methods will be the choice of the citizens themselves, through their school officials...Adequate areas for non-nuisance industrial plants have been set aside... workers will be attracted from outside the community. Transportation is such as to make this convenient and feasible.

Population Data:

THE SURROUNDING AREA

The area surrounding the site within a ten-mile radius combines rich Illinois farm lands, productive truck garden areas, recreational spaces, typical suburban towns and heavy industrial concentrations in balanced proportions. To the south and the west lie agricultural lands with scattered small villages and retail centers. Immediately adjacent to the north and extending toward Chicago along the suburban line of the Illinois Central are such suburban towns as Olympia Fields, Flossmoor and Homewood. Other suburban towns are found along the Rock Island Railroad line running southwest toward Joliet, while still others are found north and east of the site near the border of Chicago.

On the border of the ten-mile limit adjacent to the city limits of Chicago are Blue Island, Harvey and Riverdale, where are found many industries. A closer industrial center is a few miles east of the site in the city of Chicago Heights.

The estimated population of the area is 164,598. As would be expected, the density of population is greatest in that part of the area nearest Chicago.

In the area surrounding the site within a 20-mile radius, the emphasis becomes increasingly urban and industrial with the inclusion of the heavy concentrations of industries in both the Indiana and Illinois parts of the Calumet industrial area. Also included are the industries in the Pullman, West Pullman, Burnside and Gresham areas of Chicago. The northern limit of this area extends all the way to 55th Street.

To the west at the extreme border of the 20-mile radius are Joliet and Lockport, while to the east the area extends to Gary, Indiana. The southern boundaries reach into Kankakee County, Illinois, a few miles short of the city of Kankakee.

The estimated population for the larger area is 1,350,000; of this number approximately 800,000 live in Chicago and 260,000 live in the Hammond, Gary, East Chicago and Whiting area.

The public and other transportation facilities to surrounding areas from the town site are discussed separately. In the area surrounding the site within a 20-mile radius, the emphasis becomes increasingly urban and industrial with the inclusion of the heavy concentrations of industries in both the Indiana and Illinois parts of the Calumet industrial area. Also included are the industries in the Pullman, West Pullman, Burnside and Gresham areas of Chicago. The northern limit of this area extends all the way to 55th Street.

[Editor's note: For a map of the metropolitan area click on "Map of Chicago Metropolitan Area."]

THE TOWN SITE

The town site is composed of about 2300 acres of gently rolling land; some of it is well wooded. The terrain permits the ready development of a lake or lagoon. A permanent green belt, the Forest Preserve, borders it to the east and somewhat south.

Directly east of the Forest Preserve are Chicago Heights and South Chicago Heights; to the west and on the other side of the Illinois Central tracks is the little village of Matteson; the north terminus at the furthermost point is Lincoln Highway, Route 30, which is commonly described as 211th Street.

SOURCES OF EMPLOYMENT

A survey has been made of the principal sources of employment within a 20-mile radius of the town site. This limit was chosen as a study of available transportation indicated that generally the comfortable commuting radius is approximately 20 miles, with the exception of commuting to the Chicago Loop. The survey does not cover the Loop area. The principal sources of industrial employment are found in the Pullman, West Pullman, Burnside, Gresham, South Chicago and Calumet areas of Chicago; the Indiana towns of Gary,, Hammond, Whiting and East Chicago; Harvey and Joliet, Illinois. The closest source of industrial employment, of course, is Chicago Heights where the principal industrial plants employ approximately 9500 persons. The industrial areas are indicated on the accompanying area map.

Commercial centers which employ in the aggregate a vast number of persons are found in the parts of Chicago and the towns mentioned above. These are listed hereafter, together with the names of the principal manufacturers and other employers in the 20-mile area. The site is particularly attractive to the University of Chicago because of accessible public transportation.

CHICAGO HEIGHTS AREA INDUSTRIES (Page 1)

(Editor's note: Some addresses could not be reproduced, photocopy available at Park Forest Public Library.)

American Locomotive Company
23rd Street & Euclid Avenue
Columbia Tool Steel Company
392 East 14th Street
American Manganese Steel Division
The American Brake Shoe Company
389 East 14th Street
D-G Foundry Company
12th Street & Portland Avenue
American Stoveboard Company
16th and State Streets
Diamond Braiding Mills, Inc.
181 East 16th Street
Armour Fertilizer Works
10th and State Streets
Diamond Wire & Cable Company
117 East 16th Street
Ayer Manufacturing Company
2015 Halsted Street
Dowell, Incorporated
Sauk Trail and East End Avenue
Bisbee Linseed Company
2012 Butler Street
Edgewood Textile Mills, Inc.
7 East l9th Place
Calumet Steel Division
Borg-Warner Corporation
11th Street and Wentworth Avenue
Flintkote Company
l7th Street & Wentworth Avenue
Canedy-Otto Manufacturing Company
Main Street & East End Avenue
Forster Textile Mills, Inc.
17th Street & Union Avenue
Cardox Corporation
Monee, Illinois
Funk Forging Company
17th Street & Fifth Avenue
Chicago Heights Pattern and Model Works
216 Morgan Street
Gold Seal Asphalt Roofing Company
11th & State Streets
Chicago Heights Trading Company
1632 Wentworth Avenue
Haffner-Thrall Car Company
26th and Butler Streets
Chicago Table Company, or American Bed Company
1805 East End Avenue
Benjamin Harris & Company
13th and State Streets

CHICAGO HEIGHTS AREA INDUSTRIES (Page 2)

Highway Steel Products Company
1326 McKinley Avenue
National Battery Company
12th Street & McKinley Avenue
Illinois Shade Cloth Corporation
17th Street & Union Avenue
Nebraska Bridge Supply & Lumber Company
72 East 23rd Street
Inland Steel Company
Main Street & Birmingham Avenue
Oscar Reinhold Factories, Inc.
17th Street & Center Avenue
Industrial Oil & Varnish Company
70 East 23rd Street
Steger Furniture Manufacturing Company
3321 Chicago Road
Steger, Illinois
International Minerals & Chemical Corporation
16th and State Streets
Steger Products Manufacturing Corporation
3317 Chicago Road
Steger, Illinois
Keystone Asphalt Products Company
East 16th Street
The Tile-Tex Company
1232 McKinley Avenue
Kimble Glass Company
12th and Arnold Streets
Victor Chemical Works
11th and Arnold Streets
King Cole Breweries
17th and Hanover Streets
Wardway Paint Works
10th and Washington Streets
Lyon Metal Products, Inc.
507 Arnold Street
Weber Costello Company
12th Street & McKinley Avenue
Mid-West Forging & Manufacturing Company
East 16th Street
Wesco Waterpaints, Inc.
Matteson, Illinois
Midwest Plastic Products Company
28th Street & East End Avenue
Western Metal Abrasives Company
101 East Main Street
Morden Frog and Crossing Works
12th &Washington Streets

Manufacturers in 10-Mile Radius
250 Employees or More

BLUE ISLAND

Libby, McNeill & Libby
13636 South Western Avenue
(Foods)
North American Car Corporation
2667West 135th Street
(MetalTrades & Fabrication)

HARVEY

Allied Steel Castings Company
(Iron, Steel & Smelting, etc.)
Bliss and Laughlin, Inc.
155th and Halsted
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
The Buda Company
(Metal Trades &Fabrication)
George M. Clark and Company
Division of American Store Company
156th Street
(Metal Trades & Fabrication)
Perfection Gear Company
152nd and South Halsted Street
(Metal Trades & Fabrication)
Whiting Corporation
157th Street
(Metal Trades & Fabrication)
Wyman Gordon
(Metal Trades & Fabrication)

RIVERDALE

Acme Steel Company
(Iron, Steel & Smelting, etc.)

STEGER

Steger Furniture Manufacturing Company
3321 Chicago Road
(Radio Cabinets)

Railroad Locations in 10-Mile Radius
250 Employees or More

Railroad Location
Baltimore and Ohio
    Barr Yard
134th between Ashland and Halsted
Chicago, Eastern Illinois
    Yard Center
Encompassing the area of Crete, Chicago Heights,
Steger, Thornton, South Harlem, Yard Center (147th St.]
Illinois Central System
    Markham
South of Harvey - between Harvey and Homewood
New York Central
    Indiana Harbor and Belt Line
Approximately 10 miles north of town site

Commercial Centers' Located
10-Mile Radius

Blue Island and Riverdale Area

Harvey

Calumet City

Chicago Heights

Manufacturers in 10-20 Mile Radius
250 Employees or More

CHICAGO
Agar Manufacturing Corp. of Illinois
5133 West 65th Street
(Corrugated boxes and shipping cases)
Chicago Bridge and Iron Company
1305 West 105th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Angelus Campfire Company
4800 West 66th Street
(Confectionery)
Chicago Malleable Castings Company
1225 West 120th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Allied Steel Castings Company
1225 West 120th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Chicago Steel and Wire Company
10257 South Torrence Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
American Ship Building Company
East 101st Street & Calumet River
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
The Columbia Mills, Inc.
12100 South Peoria Street
(Shade cloth, window shades, etc.)
Automatic Transportation Company and Walker Vehicle Company
101 West 87th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Continental Can Company
7600 South Racine Avenue
231 East 95th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
American Brake Shoe Company
1220 West 119th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Federal Electric Company, Inc.
8700 South State Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Bethlehem Steel Company
8301 South Stewart
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Ford Motor Company
12600 Torrence Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Borg-Warner Corporation
Ingersoll Steel and Disc Division
1000 West 120th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
General Chemical Company
12600 South Carondelet
Calumet Works
(Heavy chemicals)

Charles A. Brewer and Sons
6320 South Harvard Avenue
(Hot dish mats, punch board games)
Great Lakes Plant
American Forge Division
1220 West 119th Street
Burnside Steel Foundry Company
1300 East 92nd Street
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company
5700 South Perry Avenue
(Bakery products, coffee roasting)
CHICAGO (cont'd)

International Harvester Company
2701 East 106th Street and 1015 West 120th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Van Cleaf Brothers
7800 South Woodlawn Avenue
(Tapes, repair kits, rubber cements, etc.)
Interlake Iron Corporation
11236 South Torrence Avenue
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
Verson All Steel Press Company
1355 East 93rd Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Ingersoll Steel and Disc Division
Borg-Warner Corporation
1000 West 120th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Wisconsin Steel Division
International Harvester Company
2701 East 196th Street
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
National Cylinder Gas Company
10305 South Torrence Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication]
Cudahy Packing Company
9101 Baltimore
Pressed Steel Car Company
East 136th and South Brandon Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
CALUMET CITY

United Chemical and Organic Products Company
Division of Wilson and Company
Hirsch-Stein Crossing
(Chemicals and petroleum)

Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company
11001 South Cottage Grove Avenue, and
East 130th Street & Calumet River
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
EAST CHICAGO, INDIANA
Republic Steel Corporation
Electric Steel Unit
11800 South Burley Avenue, and
7850 South Chicago Avenue
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
American Steel Foundries
3761 Canal Street
3200 Dickey Road
(Iron, Steel and Smelting;, etc.)
Rheem Manufacturing Company
76th Street and Kedzie Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Calumet Foundry and. Machine Company
14801 Railroad Avenue
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
W. C. Ritchie and Company.
8801 South Baltimore Avenue
(Paper and boxes)
Cities Service Oil Company
Cline Avenue
(Chemicals and petroleum)
Sherwin-Williams Company
115th and Cottage Grove Avenue
(Chemicals and Petroleum)
Continental Foundry Machine Company
144th Street and Railroad Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
EAST CHICAGO (cont'd.)

The Crane Company
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
United States Gypsum Company
(Non-Metallics and Clay Products)
Cudahy Packing Company
(Foods)
Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company
9355 Kreiter Avenue
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
Edward Valve and Manufacturing Company, Inc.
1200 West 145th Street
East Chicago, Indiana
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
GARY, INDIANA

American Bridge Company
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)

General American Transportation Corporation
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Bear Brand Hosiery Company
205 East 21st Street
(Clothing and Textiles)
Graver Tank and Manufacturing Company, Inc.
4509 Tod Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Carnegie-Illinois Steel Corp.
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
Harbison Walker Refractories Company
4343 Kennedy Avenue
(Non-Metallics and Clay Products)
Gary Screw and Bolt Company
4950 South Morgan Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Albert Given Manufacturing Company
1301 West Chicago Street
(Men's trousers)
National Tube Company
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
International Smelting and Refining Company
420 East 151st Street
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
Standard Steel Spring Company
2600 East Fifth Street
Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Sinclair Refining Company
(Chemicals and petroleum)
HAMMOND, INDIANA

American Steel Foundries
4831 Hohman Avenue
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)

Socony-Vacuum Oil Company
13523 South Indianapolis
(Chemicals and petroleum.)
W. B. Conkey Company
601Conkey
(Printing and Publishing)
Standard Forgings Corporation
3444 Dickey Avenue
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)
Hammond Brass Works
1544 Summer Street
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)

HAMMOND (cont'd.)

Hydrox Corporation
(Ice cream and beverages)
HARVEY (cont'd.)

George M. Clark and Company
Division of American Stove Company
156th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)

Junior Toy Corporation
215 Marble Street
(Velocipedes, scooters, outdoor furniture)
Perfection Gear Company
152nd and South Halsted Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
LaSalle Steel Company
150th and Magnolia
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Whiting Corporation
157th Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Pullman-Standard Car Manuacturing Company
1414 Fields Avenue
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Wyman Gordon
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Standard Railway Equipment Manufacturing Company
4527 Columbia Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
JOLIET, ILLINOIS

Acme Steel Company
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)

Manhattan Shirt Company
730 Hoffman Street
(Men's dress shirts)
American Can Company
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)

American Steel and Wire Company
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)

WHITING, INDIANA

Standard Oil Company of Indiana
(Chemicals and petroleum)

American Cyanamid and Chemical Company

Blockson Chemical Company

HARVEY, ILLINOIS

Allied Steel Castings Company
(Iron, Steel and Smelting, etc.)

Carnegie Illinois Steel Company

Cudahy Packing Company

Bliss and Laughlin, Inc,
155th and Halsted
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
General Refractories Company

Gerlach-Barklow Company
(Printing and Publishing)

The Buda Company
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Joliet Roth Washer Company

JOLIET (cont'd.)

Joliet Wall Paper Company
Logan Street
(Wall paper)
Sarell Manufacturing Company

F. E. Schundler Company

Logan Wall Paper Mills Star Peerless Wall Paper Mill

United Wall Paper Company
[Paper and boxes]

National Cylinder Gas Company
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
Lenon Wall Paper Mill
Phoenix Manufacturing Company
North Broadway
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
American Baking Company
William E. Pratt Manufacturing Company
18 Henderson Street
(Metal Trades and Fabrication)
LOCKPORT,ILLINOIS
Rubberoid Company The Texas Company
[Chemicals and petroleum]

Railroad Locations in 10-20 Mile Radius
250 Employees or More
Railroad Location
Baltimore and Ohio
    East Chicago freight yard
    ForrestHill
East Chicago
Between 74th and 79th Streets
Chicago, Eastern Illinois
    Englewood
6600 Union Avenue
Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway Company
    Burr Oak Freight House
    Hamilton park offices
    Blue Island freight yard
    Blue Island shops
71st Steet
Approximately 119th Street
Approximately 122nd Street
Chesapeake and Ohio
    Calumet freight yards
110th and Constance
(operated jointly with Nickel Plate Railroad)
Elgin, Joliet and Eastern
    Joliet
    Gary
Joliet
Gary
Erie
    51st Street - Chicago to Hammond
51st Street out to Hammond
Grand Trunk - Western
    Elgin yards
53rd and Central
Illinois Central System
    Scattered ticket offices
    and freight yards from 63rd
    and Dorchester
    Burnside
    Accounting Department
55th and end of the line at Matteson
63rd and Kimbark

95th and Woodlawn
63rd and Dorchester

New York Central
    Indiana Harbor Belt Line
161st and Kennedy (includes freight yards
at 63rd Street and Blue Island
all the way out to Franklin)

Railroad Location
Nickel Plate Railroad
    Yard and freight offices
103rd and Stony Island (takes in shops
and yard from 93rd to 103rd)
Pennsylvania Railroad
    Freight yard
    Freight yard

    Colehour freight yard

55th and Stewart
59th and Damon (between Damon and Western Ave.)

106th and Indianapolis Boulevard

Wabash
    Landers yard
79th and California

Utility Companies in 10-20 Mile Radius
250 Employees or More

Utility Company Location
Commonwealth Edison Company
    State Line Station
    Calumet Generating Station
Hammond and the Lake
32 East 100th [100th and the River]
Public Service Company of Northern Illinois
    Calumet Generating Station
Location: 32 East 100th

Commercial Centers in 10-20 Mile Radius

Chicago
    55th
    Woodlawn
    Englewood (Southtown)
    South Shore
    Grand Crossing
    South Chicago
    Beverly
    Roseland
    West Pullman
55th Street
63rd and Cottage Grove
63rd and Halsted Street
East 71st Street
75th and Cottage Grove
92nd and Commercial
95th and Ashland Avenue
111th and Michigan
199th and Halsted
Others

    Burnham
    Calumet City
    Joliet
    East Chicago
    Gary
    Hammond
    Whiting

Other Employers in 10-20 Mile Radius

Institution Location
University of Chicago 59th and University
Oak Forest Institutions Oak Forest, Illinois
Chicago Municipal Airport 63rd and Cicero Avenue
Hospitals
    Roseland Community
    Little Company of Mary
    South Chicago Community
11101 South Perry
95th and California Avenue, Evergreen Park
2320 East 93rd Street
TRANSPORTATION

Public transportation is being provided within the community itself in addition to already available transportation serving to bring people to and from employment, stores, professional offices, schools and recreational areas. The areas from which people will be drawn to and from the community for these purposes are the Chicago Loop and inter-lying communities; Chicago Heights, Joliet, the cities in the southeast Cook County and northwestern Indiana areas, such as Calumet City, Gary and Hammond.

Freight shipments to the community and from proposed industrial plants in the town may be routed on either the Elgin, Joliet and Eastern (Belt Line) Railroad or the Michigan Central (New York Central System) Railroad to or from any destination as both of these lines cross the townsite in the area reserved for non-nuisance industrial development.

Rail Transportation - Passenger

Rail transportation to the Chicago loop in 46 minutes via the Illinois Central Main Line Electric suburban transit system is available from stations at Richton Park, Matteson, or 211th Street (Lincoln Highway ? U.S. 30), with forty trips a day regularly scheduled. Intermediate points as well as transfer accommodations to the Illinois Central's Blue Island spur, South Shore spur, (terminal at 91st Street) and the South Shore Line trains to Gary, Michigan City and South Bend are also available. Fare to the Loop by commutation, 60-ride monthly ticket, is 18 cents. Connecting bus service from the community to the I. C. station at 211th Street has been arranged with the South Suburban Safeway Lines, Inc. (motor bus) at five cents a ride each way.

From 112th Street-Illinois Central Station Time-Minutes Tariffs-One Way Round-Trip Rate *Commutation
Chicago Loop 46 .47 .72 .18
Harvey 13 .13 .24 .10
Kensington (115th Street) 22 .22 .40 .14
West Pullman 29 .24 .44 .14
Blue Island 35 .28 .50 .145
63rd Street 34 .32 .58 .15
91st Street (South Chicago) 42 .35 .64 .16
**Hegewish 28 .32 .60 .24
**East Chicago 37 .44 .84 .28
**Hammond 32 .39 .74 .25
**Gary 52 .61 1.18 .36
**Michigan City 89 1.30 2.56 - -
**South Bend 137 2.18 4.32 - -

*Commutation rates are based on the multiple ticket which computes most favorably per ride
**via South Shore - Illinois Central

Bus Transportation

The South Suburban Safeway Lines, Inc. operates a vast network of bus lines interconnecting communities throughout the southernpart of Cook County and these communities with the Chicago Loop. More than thirty trips a day are made from Chicago Heights to the Loop and more than forty trips a day to the commercial section, at 63rd and Halsted Streets from which elevated and surface railroad transit service is available. Service to Calumet City (Hammond, Indiana) is available by either South Suburban Safeway Lines, Inc. or Gold Star Lines, the latter of which controls the service to Joliet. The South Suburban System runs south to Steger and Crete. Southern Limited., Inc. provides service to Kankakee, Watseka, Danville, and other cities to the south. Southern Limited is an interstate carrier, however, and no commutation service is offered. The South Suburban system will provide connecting service between Park Forest and the Chicago Heights bus terminal from which all of the above service originates at a fare of ten cents (commutation rate 7 1/2 cents). Further, South Suburban Safeway Lines, Inc. is now obtaining equipment and making necessary arrangements to provide the town with a complete intra-city transportation system at five cent rates to any point. They will also provide adequate connections with adjacent cities and transportation terminals. The accompanying area map indicates possible arrangement of these proposed routes.

Bus Transportation
Present Data From Chicago Heights
to Communities Listed

Minutes Fares
One Way
Fares
Round Trip
*Commutation Rate
Chicago Loop 100 .35 .65 .25
63rd and Halsted 65 .35 .60 .21
West Pullman 37 .30 .60 .20
Harvey 25 .20 .40 .15
Homewood 10 .10 .20 .075
211th Street I. C. Station 12 .10 .20 .079
Crete 15 .10 .20 .075
Blue Island 49 .30 .60 .20
Calumet City (Hammond) 35 .35 .65 .25
Pullman-Ford - .30 .60 .20
**Hammond 40 .25 1/2 - -
**Joliet 60 .32 - -
Phoenix 20 .20 .40 .15

*School tickets sold at 20% off commutation fares
**via Gold Star Lines

COPY

S0UTH SUBURBAN SafeWay Lines, Inc.
Rendering Modern Bus Service to Chicago and
Its Great South Suburban Cities and Communities
Offering Charter Buses to Anywhere

215 East 154th Street
Harvey, Illinois
November 19, 1946

American Community Builders
105 West Monroe Street
Chicago 3, Illinois

Gentlemen

Attention: Mr. Philip M. Klutznick

The officers of this company have been informed by Mr. Sweet and Mr. Waldmann of your organization, that your plans to build a city just west of Chicago Heights, Illinois, are progressing satisfactorily. Your new community, of course, will require transportation within its city limits, and also to and from Chicago Heights and to and from the Illinois Central Depot at 211th Street. We shall be glad to furnish those services, and we appreciate your interest in our company.

This company, if authorized to do so by the Illinois Commerce Commission, will render bus services to and from the community and within the community. You can be sure that our services will be entirely as satisfactory to the residents of your community as our present services are to the residents of Chicago Heights, Harvey, Blue Island, and other communities in the territory we serve. We shall operate buses that are safe and modern, and maintained to a high degree of efficiency; and we shall operate them at such frequencies and over such routes as the traffic will support.

Within the limits of your new city we propose a fare of 5¢. To and from Chicago Heights, and to and from the Illinois Central Depot at 211th Street, we propose a single ride cash fare of 10¢, and a 10-ride ticket at 75¢, or 7 ½ cents a ride. This company has been operating in this locality since 1928, and it has never sought an increase in fare. The records will show that we have consistently, and in all cases voluntarily, reduced fares. We believe in low fares, and we contribute much of our success to the fact that we have always operated at the lowest possible fares.

During your period of construction we propose to render such bus services as will be necessary to transport workers to and from the various projects within your near city. We suggest that these special buses operate to and from Chicago Heights and also the Illinois Central Depot at 211th Street.

You will find us ready to cooperate with you at all times, and we shall welcome the opportunity to sit in at any conferences that will include the subject of transportation. We know we have the resources and the experience to assure the residents of your community of the best possible transportation. Our reputation in the communities we have served for the past eighteen years is evidence of our ability to satisfy both you and the residents of the community you will build.

Yours very truly,
/s/ Paul 0. Dittmar
President

COPY

SOUTH SUBURBAN SafeWay Lines, Inc.
Rendering Modern Bus Service to Chicago and
Its Great South Suburban Cities and Communities
Offering Charter Buses to Anywhere
215 East 154th Street
Harvey, Illinois
November 22, 1946

American Community Builders
105 West Monroe Street
Chicago 3, Illinois

Gentlemen

Attention: Mr. Philip M. Klutznick

Supplementing, our letter of November 19, and following the request of your Mr. Sweet, we desire to say that we would be willing to operate at a 5¢ fare from and to outlying points in your city to and from the center or business district of your city. Also, we would be willing to operate at a 5¢ fare from the center or business district of your city to the Illinois Central?Depot at 211th Street; and/ /at a 10¢ cash fare, or a 10-ride ticket at 75¢, from and to points in/ /the southern half of your city to and from the Illinois Central Depot at 211th Street.

Of course the matter of fares is subject to consideration by and approval of the Illinois Commerce Commission.

Yours very truly,
/s/ Paul 0. Dittmar

BOB:EG

Privately-owned Motor Vehicle Transportation

Excellent highways in all directions provide Park Forest with safe, fast means of transit for all who prefer to use private cars for transportation. Lincoln Highway at the north border of the community is U. S. Highway No. 30, one of the principal transcontinental arteries extending from New York City to San Francisco. One?half mile west of thecommunity lies the Governor's Highway, U. S. 54, a modern, high speed artery and the main route from Chicago to the state capitol at Springfield. One-half mile to the east of the town site lies Illinois State Highway No. 1, a direct route from Chicago to Terre Haute and Evansville, Indiana. Excellent county roads provide choice of several methods of approach to the town from all points in the Chicago metropolitan area.

The table which follows gives an indication of the speed and facility with which nearby communities can be reached from Park Forest.

Transportation via Private Automobile

10-Mile Radius
To Via Mileage Time
Harvey Western Avenue and U.S. 54 9 15
Homewood Western Avenue 5 8
Steger Steger Road 2.5 5
Crete Steger Road - No. 1 5 9
Riverdale Western Avenue and U. S. 54
and No. 1
.5 18
Blue Island Western Avenue 11 20
Calumet City Western Avenue and U.S. 54
147th Street
13 23
Chicago Heights Industrial Section U.S. 30 4 7

10-20 Mile Radius

To Via Mileage Time
Joliet U.S. 30 19 10-35 (est.)
Chicago Loop U.S. 54 and Western Avenue 28 57
West Pullman U. S. 54 and Western Avenue 13 22
87th & Stewart U.S. 54 and Western Avenue 18 31
116th Street & Avenue "O" U.S. 30 Torrence Avenue, Sibley Avenue, Avenue "O" 24 39
South Chicago 95th and Lake U.S. 30 Torrence Avenue, Sibley Avenue, Avenue "O" 24 39
112th and Torrance U.S. 30, Torrance Avenue 20 29
126th and Torrance Avenue U.S. 30, Torrance Avenue 18 26
138th and Torrance
(Hegewisch)
U.S. 30, Torrance Avenue 17 24
Hammond, Indiana
    Russell & Hohman Avenue (Downtown Hammond)
    Lever Brothers-Indianapolis Boulevard
    Indianapolis Boulevard & Nickle Plate RR
    (Pullman-Hammond Works)

    Sauk Trail #141, U.S. 41, Hohman Avenue

    Calumet Avenue & Indianapolis Boulevard
    Sauk Trail #141, Calumet Avenue, 169th Street & Indianapolis Boulevard

15 25
East Chicago, Indiana
    Indianpolis Blvd. & Michigan Blvd. (East Ave., 169th St. & Chicago City Line, Shell Oil Co. Refinery)
    Indianapolis Blvd. & Downtown South Chicago

    Sauk Trail #141, Calumet

    Indianapolis Blvd.

    Indianapolis Blvd.

19

22

22

34

Whiting, Indiana

    Indianapolis Blvd. & Whiting City Limits
Sauk Trail #141, Calumet Ave., 169th Street, Indianapolis Blvd. 24 38
Gary, Indiana

    Broadway & 15th Avenue
    Broadway & U.S. 12, South Shore Station
Sauk Trail #141, Calumet Ave., 169th Street & 15th Avenue (Gary)
Broadway
25

26

42

47

FIRST HOUSES

The first houses are to consist of slightly more than 3000 rental units. This approach is calculated to meet the current dire need for rental facility and at the same time to weave into the overall plan for the development of the community.

The first houses consist of a limited number of 1 bedroom accommodations. The prevailing types are 2 and 3 bedroom accommodations with full basements of the twin and town and country design. We have avoided the use of the word "row house". Instead we describe them as town and country houses. We have tried to produce for the Chicago area a type of multiple accommodation which does not conform to the mental pattern of in-town row houses. The whole theme of the first houses is the urge to provide accommodations which will meet family needs for inside and outdoor living. Consequently, every dwelling with the exception of the 1 bedroom accommodations is provided with a full basement. Even in the case of the 1 bedroom homes a half basement is reserved. Extra size living rooms, adequate dining rooms, extra size bedrooms and modern kitchens and bathrooms are all designed to meet the needs of adults and children

The site plan is open. The density has been purposely kept down to about 10 per acre. Land coverage is generally around 11%. Provision is made for a clearly discernible front and back yard, large enough to give the families a sense of privacy and small enough not to discourage its proper maintenance. Tot yards, play grounds and protected ways are placed at usable locations. Facilities for off street parking are designed to keep the roads clear and provide convenience for the tenants and ready access for service. At the same time they are located so as not to mar or destroy the beauty of the park area into which the front elevations of the houses face.

The whole first-program is predicated on the simple proposition that this suburban rental community shall feature a preference for families with children and provide them with the facilities indoors and outdoors that will stimulate them to enjoy their environment.

[Ed. Note: 2 Architectural renderings of the town homes follow this. They exist as independent images on the website. The first is saved as "planoftown1.jpg." Park Forest: An Illinois Planned Community, Record no. 27.

(6-05) It is untitled on the drawing, and shows rental townhouse buildings which look very much like they did when they were built. The second drawing is saved as "planoftown2.jpg" and is Record no. 114 (in 6-05.) It is titled, "For Future Development", and shows three-story apartment complexes which were never built in Park Forest.]

SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES

Schools

A study of the school facilities in the areas surrounding the town site of Park Forest indicates that existing facilities will need to be augmented to accommodate the children of the families moving into the town. The problem has been discussed with Mr. Noble Puffer, Superintendent of Schools of Cook County, the officials of the local school districts concerned, and Dr. William C. Reavis, Chairman of the Committee on Appointments and Field Services, Department of Education, University of Chicago. The methods discussed here will provide the supplementary schools which will be required. The programis being developed in collaboration with the officials named.

The entire town site of Park Forest falls into six elementary districts, two high school districts and one non high school district. The rental areas for which the application is being submitted are in three elementary districts, one high school district and the non high school district. The areas are in Elementary Districts Nos. 170 and 194 and High School District No. 206; Elementary District No. 163 and the non high school district.

In arriving at the estimate of the number of children for whom school facilities will be required, we have examined school statistics in three housing developments for veterans. These, taken together with the experience of Mr. Puffer and Professor Reavis, indicate that we can expect slightly more than one school age child per family. Because of the preference which will be given to veterans in the renting of houses, it is believed that the number of high school age children will be negligible. The table below indicates the number of elementary school age children which are anticipated, and also shows the number of children that can be accommodated in existing school facilities. The latter figure was arrived at after discussions with the officials of the school districts concerned.

School District Estimated Number of Pupils To Be Accomodated in Existing Facilities To Be Furnished Temporary Facilities by A.C.B.
No. 170 875 875 0
Np. 194 550 100 450
No. 163 1,775 0 1,775
3,200 975 2,225

It will be necessary, therefore, to provide temporary accomodations for 2,225 students. Until Districts 194 and 163 are able to construct the necessary facilities, the American Community Builders will provide the required temporary buildings as needed. Since, according to Professor Reavis, 20 square feet per student is required, this will involve the provision of approximately 27,000 square feet. It is planned to set aside town and country houses in sufficient numbers to provide this amount of space if needed. The interiors of these houses will be finished for residential occupancy when permanent school facilities are made available by theschool districts. It is planned that the equipping and staffing of the temporary schools will be done by the school districts with monies received by them from the State Equalization Fund.

The preliminary study of the school problem indicates that regrouping of the parts of the numerous districts within the town site into one district may be desirable. To provide for the ultimate school needs, the American Community Builders is reserving a minimum of five sites for grammar schools and a larger site for a high school.

Churches

Several church sites have been set aside in the basic town plan. The assignment of land to various denominations is being worked out in collaboration with the Chicago Church Federation. In addition, there is a Catholic church, St. Anne's, already located within the town site.

RECREATION AND PLAY SPACE

In each rental area from ten to twenty "tot yards" have been set aside for play purposes. These yards which will be enclosed and provided with benches and sand boxes, will permit smaller children to play near their homes under the watchful eyes of their mothers. A larger playground is being provided for each area. They are large enough for softball and other group sports and will have seesaws, swings and other playground equipment. These yards will be surfaced and well drained so that play space will be available even in periods of inclement weather. The play equipment will be designed for all age levels so that smaller children can use the playgrounds when the "tot yards" are not usable after heavy rains.

UTILITY SERVICES

General Aim

An opportunity has been presented to the American Community Builders, Inc. to plan an ideal utility system for a modern community because we are not handicapped by existing inadequate, misplaced and antiquated utility service lines.

The basic aim of the general utility plan is a safe, clean, smokeless community with all utility service lines placed underground to assure uninterrupted service, and to eliminate unsightly overhead lines which are hazards for fire fighting equipment. General cleanliness is promoted by the elimination of the delivery, storage and use of oil or coal fuel throughout the community for any purpose.

A detailed utility cost analysis served as a basis for the selection of the various fuel distribution systems and method of utilization. Economy of installation and/ /operation were controlling factors.

Electric Energy and Gas Fuel Services

The attached letter from the Public Service Company of Northern Illinois describes the arrangement under which it will provide the electric and gas distribution systems. The Illinois Bell Telephone Company has tentatively agreed to provide underground distribution facilities for communication services.

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY
of Northern Illinois
72 West Adams Street
Chicago 3, Illinois

January 8, 1947

Mr. Charles Waldman[n]
American Community Builders, Inc.
105 West Monroe Street
Chicago, Illinois

Dear Mr.Waldmann:

This is confirming our recent conversation. We are planning to supply gas and electric service to the new community which your organization is developing south of Route 30 between Matteson and Chicago Heights, Illinois.

While we are now operating under an Illinois Commerce Commission gas limitation order expiring April 30, 1947, the pipeline expansion (now in progress) when completed, will result in additional gas being available to our company during the latter part of this year, such that we shall be able to supply gas required for residential space heating purposes in this project.

We appreciate the opportunity of working with you and your organization in the development of the new community and are looking forward to supplying both gas and electric service.

Yours very truly,
/s/ A. H. Schneider
General Sales Manager

COPY

Utility Service Selection

1. In residences:

(a) Electric energy - retail purchase by tenants.

(b) Gas fuel - retail purchase by tenants.

2. For non-residential facilities

(a) Electric energy - for illumination and miscellaneous power in:

(b) Gas fuel - for all cooking, water and space heating in non residential buildings, except in large industrial plants.

Water Supply

A research study conducted in conjunction with the State Water Survey Division, Urbana, Illinois; the State Geological Survey Division, Urbana, Illinois, and the National Geodetic Survey in Washington, D.C., augmented by local experience in the neighboring towns indicated that an ample supply of water could be obtained by deep wells of sufficient number and capacity drilled into good producing aquifers at approximately 300 feet below ground surface.

At the present time the construction work on two 300 feet deep wells has been completed and is ready for capacity and quality tests tentatively set for February 17, 1947.

Both wells consist of 24" steel casing with 16" concentric steel liner (approximately 100 feet) terminating in the Niagara lime rock; thereafter 15" unlined drilled holes in the above rock into apparently good aquifers at 300 feet below surface.

The present plan calls for two 1,000 gallon-per-minute capacity wells.

A 6' deep well of 200 gallon-per-minute capacity on the site was installed not long ago. This well will be used to provide water for construction and as a standby for emergency uses.

Due to the fact that the water supply in this area is extremely hard (approximately 460 parts per million total hardness), a water softening plant of 1,000,000 gallon maximum daily capacity is planned to provide filtered, softened water for the project.

The water supply system includes a 500,000 gallon water storage tank on a 100 ft. tower.

The entire water distribution system is planned to operate on 40 lbs. working pressure.

The water system will be operated by the American Community Builders, Inc. If a municipality is organized, then should it be mutually agreeable, arrangements for municipal operation may be perfected. Appropriate authority will be secured at the proper time.

State of Illinois
STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DIVISION
M. M. Leighton, Chief
URBANA
September 3, 1946

GEOLOGICAL REPORT
ON THE GROUNDWATER POSSIBILITIES
IN AN AREA EAST, AND SOUTH 0F CHICAGO HEIGHTS

(Prepared in response to a request from Mr. Philip M. Klutznick, 111 West Monroe Street, Chicago 3, Illinois)

Mr. Klutznick desires information on the groundwater possibilities of approximately 2600 acres in all or parts of secs. 23, 24, 25, 26, 35, 36, T. 35 N., R. 13 E., and secs. 19, 30, 31, T. 35 N., R. 14. E., Cook County, and secs. 1 and 2, T. 34. N., R. 13 /E., /Will County. The ground surface elevation ranges from about 690 to about 750 feet above sea level.

The unconsolidated glacial drift directly below the ground surface ranges from about 50 to 100 feet in thickness and consists chiefly of clays and till. The drift in this area is not known to contain material worthy of testing for a supply of water.

The solid bedrock under the glacial drift is a dolomite of Silurian age. If the dolomite is sufficiently creviced it is known to yield water in this area; however, the number, size, and continuity of these crevices cannot be determined for any location prior to drilling. In general available records indicate that the Silurian is well creviced in this area and is therefore worthy of testing.

/s/ Gordon W. Prescott

Gordon W. Prescott
Assistant Geologist
Groundwater Geology and Geophysical Exploration Division

COPY

State of Illinois
STATE WATER SURVEY DIVISION
Arthur M. Buswell, Chief
URBANA, ILL.
September 22, 1941

SHORT PARTIAL MINERAL ANALYSIS

Sample of water collected from well owned by Indiana Wood Golf Club near Richton Park, Ill. Location of well: 2310•N, 1720;W. of SE corn. Of sec. 36, T. 35 1`T., R. 13 E. Depth: 160' feet. Date submitted: Sept. 8, 1941.

LABORATORY N0. 91366

Detrmination Made Pts. per million
Turbidity trace
Color 0
Odor 0
Iron Fe (unfiltered) 1.4
Chloride Cl 5
Alkalinity (as CaCo3)
    Phenolphtalein
    Methyl Orange

0
372

Total Hardness (as CaCo3) 462
Total Mineral Content 579

STATE WATER SURVEY DIVISION
T. E. Larson, Chemist
TEL/mz

COPY

State of Illinois
STATE WATER SURVEY DIVISION

Arthur M. Buswell, Chief

URBANA, ILL.

September 4, 1946

Report on Ground Water Resources

In Sections 19, 30, 31, T. 35 N., R. 14. E. and Sections 24, 25, 36, T. 35 N., R. 13 E.,Cook County

By H. F. Smith, Engineer - T. E. Larson, Chemist

This report is prepared in response to a request from Mr. Philip M. Klutznick, President, American Community Builders, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, for information on ground water possibilities in an area bounded by the Lincoln Highway between Chicago Heights and Matteson on the north; east and south by the Forest Preserve and extends approximately 8,000 feet west of Western Avenue.

Ground water in this vincinity is secured from wells penetrating the Silurian dolomite. These wells have depths of from 65 to 300 feet. As a rule little or no difficulty is experienced in securing sufficient water for residential use, however, there is no assurance that water will be encountered, at any given location. Most of the wells in this area supply water for domestic use, each house having its own well.

Should a larger ground water supply be desired than that supplying individual households, some exploratory work consisting of test drilling may be necessary as the locations of good producing aquifers are unpredictable. It will probably be desirable to have more than one well to supply water for an area of this size, even though a distribution system is used.

The city of Chicago Heights has some very good producing wells penetrating the Silurian dolomite, in fact, some of their wells produce more than 1,000 gallons per minute. Several industries in Chicago Heights also have good producing wells that penetrate the Silurian dolomite.

The village of Matteson secures its water from a Silurian dolomite well drilled to a depth of 282 feet. This well is reported to be producing approximately 2,101 gallons per minute.

A few wells have been drilled into the deep sandstones in this area but their use has largely been discontinued due to a poor water quality and limited quantity of water produced.

Water from limestone wells in this vicinity is hard (400 - 450 parts per million) and generally contains an appreciable amount of iron. The hardness is less than that at Chicago Heights and more than that at Matteson.

Sanitary Sewage Disposal

In accordance with the attached copy of the "Resolution" passed by the Board of Trustees of the Sanitary District of Bloom Township, sewerage treatment facilities will be extended to serve the new community.

The Board further declares that the present activated sludge treatment sewage disposal plant and equipment has sufficient capacity to receive and treat the sanitary sewage of the proposed community.

Mr. E. H. Ashdown, Engineer of the Bloom Township Sanitary District, reports that the plans for the installation of a 36" interceptor sanitary sewer located between the end of the proposed townsite at Ashland Avenue and the District's existing main sewer trunk line are in preparation.

The Bloom Township Sanitary District accepts responsibility to convey the community's sanitary sewerage from the terminal point of its main sanitary sewer at Ashland Avenue into its Sewage Disposal Plant and in its treatment of the sewage to comply with standards established by the authorities having jurisdiction in the area involved.

The annexation to the Bloom Township Sanitary District will be mutually beneficial; It will result in an economical annual sewage charge to the occupants of the new development, and it will increase the operating budget of the District through the additional assessed valuation.

COPY

SANITARY DISTRICT OF BLOOM TOWNSHIP
ChicagoHeights, Ill.

January 24, 1947

American Community Builders, Inc. 105 West Monroe Street
Chicago 3, Illinois

Attention: Mr. Charles Waldmann, Engineer

Gentlemen:

I am pleased to submit to you the following excerpts from the minutes of the regular meeting of our Board of Trustees of the Sanitary District of Bloom Township held on Monday, January 13, 1947, the original of which minutes is in my possession as Attorney and Corresponding Secretary. Should you wish certified copies I shall be glad to prepare them and have them duly certified by the Clerk under the seal of the District.

The minutes are as follows:

"RESOLUTION

Motion by Yanson, seconded by Barwig, that in the light of the several conferences of the Trustees with Messrs. Charles Waldmann and Carroll F. Sweet, Jr., representing the American Community Builders, Inc. in the development of the large housing project west and southwest of the City of Chicago Heights, and in view of the exchange of letters between the Sanitary District and the American Community Builders, Inc., as reported in the minutes of the meetings of our Board of Trustees held on November 18th, November 25th, November 27th and December 18th, 1946, concerning the sewerage requirements of the proposed near community and the ability of the plant and equipment of our sanitary district to receive and treat the sewage, the Trustees of the Sanitary District of Bloom Township now express their willingness to cooperate with all due speed with the American Community Builders, Inc., to the end that the area in question may be brought under the jurisdiction of our District and sewerage extended so as to serve the area of the proposed new community. Motion carried"

"Engineer E. H. Ashdown further reported that he was preparing plans for the installation of a 36" sewer from Parkside Avenue and Halsted Street to Ashland Avenue and the Michigan Central R.R. tracks and that he had prepared applications to the Illinois Post-War Planning Commission and the Federal Works ,agency for funds to defray engineering expenses. He stated that the project would be known as: "Trunk and Relief Sewer for the Southwest Portion of Sanitary District" and that it was for the purpose of serving the area now being developed as a housing project by the American Community Builders, Inc., which it is expected will be annexed to the Sanitary District of Bloom Township in the near future."

Very truly yours,

SANITARY DISTRICT OF BLOOM, TOWNSHIP

By Howard P. Roe
Attorney

Surface or Storm Drainage

Wherever the site plan and finished grading plan permits it, storm water is run off in properly designed, gently sloping, open ditch sections between sidewalks and road pavement.

Wherever the above method does not assure proper run-off, the storm water is directed through catch basins into underground storm sewers.

The present flow of storm drainage into the existing lake and toward the Forest Preserve has not been altered.

In accordance with the prepared plans, as soon as the development expands to the vicinity of the lake, a regulated and controlled main storm sewer will drain into Thorn Creek. Officials of Forest Preserve and State of Illinois, Department of Public Works and Buildings, Division of Waterways, tentatively requested and approved this method of storm water disposal.

COMMERCIAL FACILITIES

The American Community Builders, Inc. independent of the first houses is undertaking the development of essential shopping centers adequate not only to serve the rental housing, but the full town development. For the full town every factor points to a range of purchasing power of from $13,000,000 to $18,000,000 per annum in terms of 1946 prices. The present plan is based on the conservative figure of $10,000,000 in total sales. Provision is made for later expansion.

By developing an integrated community, it is possible to avoid excessive duplication of commercial facilities without sacrificing the essential element of competition. The necessities of life can be provided under uniformly high level shop conditions with prices established through competition.

This is possible in a fraction of the space presently used in the unplanned communities of similar size.

The principal shopping center is conceived as a place of simple beauty and as a safe and readily accessible center for the housewife to shop and to bring her children.

With few exceptions the entire area will be canopied. Every facility in this area will be reached without crossing a vehicular traffic artery.

When the main center is completed it will contain 225,000 square feet of rentable space for the following types of enterprises:

Supermarkets Restaurant-Tea Room
Grocery Stores Drug Stores
Bakery Shoe Repair
Meat Markets Laundryette
Variety Store Beauty Shops
5-10-25 Stire Barber Shops
Dress Shop Dairy Products
Shoe Stores Florist
Millner Stationer-Office Supply
Children's Wear Laundry-Dry Cleaning
Tailor Shop Hat Cleaning and Shoe Shine
Men's Clothing Candy Store
Men's Furnishings Bank
Women's Ready-to-Wear Bowling Alley
Furniture Store Theatres
Appliance Store Professional Offices
Hardware Store Garages and Salesrooms
Hamburger Shop Filling Station

When a secondary center is provided it will be developed with the same purpose of making it an attractive, safe and accessible place to shop. It will contain 35,000 square feet of rentable space for the following types of enterprises:

Supermarkets Beauty Shops
Grocery Stores Barber Shops
Hardware Store Laundry-Dry Cleaning
Drug Stores Filling Station

A necessity may arise far two or three shopping spots where a grocery or general store may be located. Provision is made in the land planning for the later development of such facilities as circumstances may dictate.

Perhaps one of the major community problems everywhere today is the provision of parking space. With an eye to future needs, expansive reservations of such space are made in connection with each of the shopping centers.

In connection with the main center, 600,000 square feet of parking area is provided to accommodate a peak load of 2,000 vehicles. For the secondary center, 87,000 square feet of parking area are provided to accommodate a peak load of 300 vehicles. In both instances, pedestrian and auto circulation are separate enabling the formation of pedestrian shopping greens.

[Editor's note: After this page, two drawings are inserted. The first is stored as planoftown3.jpg, and is Record no. 181 on "Park Forest: An Illinois Planned Community.(6-05) It is an architectural rendering of the shopping center with a Sears store on the left, attached to other buildings on the right by one of the covered walkways. There is a storefront in the right foreground, with two trees in the left foreground. The second is stored as planoftown4.jpg. It is labeled as Architectural drawing, number 2" and is Record no. 102 (6-05) in "Park Forest: An Illinois Planned Community. It is a drawing of the proposed shopping center with three people on the sidewalk in front of storefronts. A row of trees leads from the right foreground to the center of the drawing. Several period automobiles appear on the right hand side.]

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

The location of the town site provides a natural belt for industrial development. About 475 acres are bordered on the north by the Michigan Central and on the south by the Belt Line. This excellent trackage is supplemented by adequate water supply and electric power. The subdividing of this land for industrial use presents an interesting variety of possibilities.

To protect the basic conceit of a well-planned and clean town, only non-nuisance industries will be considered in the sale or lease of this land. A belt of green will separate this district from other parts of the town. The developers of this program are preparing a general plan for the industrial development of this area. They will act to assure the selection of the proper industries and in the approval of architectural plan of selected industies.

Within these conditions, every effort will be made to bring industry to this area to afford a supplementary source for the employment needs of the residents. Furthermore, the introduction of proper industry will tend to stabilize the community and serve to establish a sounder tax base. Developers of this program are preparing a general plan for the industrial development of this area. They will act to assure the selection of the proper industries and in the approval of architectural plan of selected industries.

[This page hand-typed in by the editor.]

[Editor's note: An illustration follows this page. It shows three trees in the immediate foreground with a two-story building in the background, with a flagpole in front. It does not resemble any of the stores which were built. It represents a factory building which could have been built in Industry Park. The illustration is stored as "planoftown5.jpg", titled, "Architectural Drawing of a Factory," Record no. 177 (6-05), on, "Park Forest: An Illinois Planned Community."]

THIS IS THE AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE

The crowded tenement and the smokey apartment have become symbols of life in our great cities . . . the choking, destructive influences of such environment have relegated our essential centers of commerce to second rate places to live and work. The flight to the better places in the suburbs has met the urgings of relatively higher income families. This need not be...nor can it long continue without disastrous results.

Our national existence is enriched by the product of our large concentrations of populations. We must bring to these centers the opportunities of the American way of life. For those who want it, this means the advantage of size combined with the simplicity of smallness ...it means access to the stimulating industry of a Chicago and, to the open and easy living of a green town...it means the opportunity to labor in the fuming and belching furnaces that make our nation strong - and to live in the tree-studded, cleansed atmosphere of a smokeless town ...it means the privilege of aiding the flow of commerce from a skyscraper and living close to earth amidst the park blocks of modern planning.

In short, it means the free man's right to seek his best work opportunity without the sacrifice of his urge to enjoy healthful and wholesome living..._This is the American way of life_...to this ideal, the town is consecrated.

FINANCIAL DATA
Park Forest

APPRAISAL REPORT
ON
PROPOSED NEW TOWN SITE SOUTH OF OLYMPIA FIELDS
BETWEEN CHICAGO HEIGHTS AND THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD - ALL IN COOK AND WILL COUNTIES, ILLINOIS,

FOR AMERICAN COMMUNITY BUILDERS, INC.,

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

NOVEMBER 20, 1946

PREPARED BY
ERNEST H. LYONS, M.A.I.
J. ALTON LAUREN, M.A.I.
J. SOULE WATERFIELD, M.A.I.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

[Editor's note: "Certificate of Valuation" page has been typed in. The original was on one page. The page beginning, "The undersigned have examined the accompanying report..." is the verso of the Certificate page.]

CERTIFICATE OF VALUATION

Ernest H. Lyons, J. Alton Lauren, and J. Soule Warterfield do hereby certify that upon application for valuation of PROPOSED NEW TOWN SITE LOCATED SOUTH OF OLYMPIA FIELDS, BETWEEN CHICAGO HEIGHTS, ILLINOIS, AND THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILOAD IN COOK AND WILL COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, AS MORE EXACTLY DESCRIBED BELOW:

FOR

AMERICAN COMMUNITY BUILDERS, INC.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The undersigned have personally examined the following described property:

LEGAL DESCRIPTION

West 20 acres of Northwest quarter of Northwest Quarter, Section 29, Township 35 North, Range 14 East, and all of North Half (except East 10 Acres of the Southeast portion thereof) of Section 30, Township 35 North, Range 14 East, and West Half of Southwest Quarter of Section 30, Township 35 North, Range 14 East, and West Quarter of Northwest Quarter Section 31, Township 35 North, Range 14 East of the 3^rd P.M., all in Bloom Township, Cook County, Illinois; East half of Southwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 35 North, Range 13 East, and East Half of West Half of Southwest Quarter and Section 24, Township 35 North, Range 13 East, and all Section 25 (except West 26 Acres of Norh Half of Northwest Quarter ) Section 25, Township 35 North, Range 14 East, and Southeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 35 North, Range 14 East, and East Half of Section 35, Township 35 North, Range 13 East (Except 10 acres more or less in Northeast corner thereof) and all Section 36, Township 35 North, Range 13 East of the3^rd P.M., all in Rich Township, Cook County, Illinois; Northeast fractional Quarter Section 2 and Northeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter of said Section 2 and also that part of the Northwest Quarter of The Southeast Quarter of said Section 2, lying Easterly of the Highway which runs in a Northeasterly and Southwesterly direction thru said NorthWest Quarter of Southeast Quarter of said Section 2, Township 34 North, Range 13 East of the 3^rd P.M. in Will County, Illinois. That part of the Northwest Quarter of Section 1, lying North of the highway designated in the Assessor's Plat of said quarter section, recorded In Book 75, Page 450, as Old Wilmington Road to Thornton, also, that part of the East 17.34 chains of the Northwest Quarter of Section 1 lying South of the Old Wilmington Road to Thornton, All in Township 34 North, Range 13 East of the 3^rd P.M. in Will County, Illinois. All of the above except Rights of Way of Railroads, Utility and Highways.

The undersigned have examined the accompanying report of the American Community Builders, Inc., which is made a part hereof, and hereby certify that for the proposed development shown there, the assembly of land previously described has, in their opinion, a fair market wholesale value of

TWO MILLION EIGHT HUNDRED EIGHTY THOUSAND DOLLARS

($2,880,000.00) as of November 20, 1946.

/s/ Ernest H. Lyons

ERNEST H. LYONS M.A.I

/s/ J. Soule Warterfield

J. SOULE WARTERFIELD M.A.I.

November 20, 1946

Is/ J. Alton Lauren_

J.ALTON LAUREN M.AI.

Continued in column to the right.

LIMITING CONDITIONS

The Certificate of Appraisal and report attached are made expressly subject to the conditions and stipulations following: No responsibility is assumed by the Appraisers for matters which are legal in nature, nor is any opinion on the title rendered herewith. This appraisal assumes good title. Any liens or encumbrances which may now exist have been disregarded and the property is appraised as though free of indebtedness.

The Appraisers herein, by reason. of this appraisal, are not required to give testimony or attendance in court with reference to the property in question, unless arrangements have been previously made therefor.

The Appraisers have no present or contemplated interest in the property appraised.

Employment in and compensation for making this appraisal are in no manner contingent upon the value reported.

This appraisal represents the best judgment of the Appraisers based upon their experience over a period of many years. It has been made in accordance with the Standards of Practice for Realtor Appraisers of the National Association of Real Estate Boards and of the American Institute of RealEstate Appraisers.

J. ALTON LAUREN & C0.
Real Estate - Insurance
53 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago
Member
American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers
Chicago Real Estate Board
Chicago Board of Underwriters
Telephone
Harrison 6775

J. ALTON LAUREN
53 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, Illinois

Born, Chicago, Illinois, August 11, 1897; president of J. Alton Lauren and Company; general real estate practice, including appraisals of commercial, residential, industrial, and farm properties; experienced in court testimony in municipal and federal courts; fee appraiser for federal agencies, banks, trust companies, insurance companies, and individuals; twenty-five years in the real estate business in the Loop in Chicago, buying, selling, managing, and appraising real estate in the metropolitan area of Chicago, as well as in many other states; principal land appraiser for the Public Works Administration, and purchaser of land for government and private agencies for low cost housing in six middle western states; deputy assessor and expert land appraiser in Cook County, 1928, and 1932-34; majored in Geology, University of Chicago; instructed in Geology; the University of Chicago; geologist for the Shell Oil Company; A.I.R.E.A. faculty member, A.I.R.E.A. Case-Study Courses, University of Chicago; Real Estate Board courses on appraising; faculty member Y.M.C.A. College, real estate courses, 1946; Major Army Air Forces 1942?46; member of A.I.R.E.A., Chicago Real Estate Board, National Association of Real Estate Boards, and Chicago Board of Underwriters.

Chicago Real Estate Board
American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers
Member of the National Association of Real Estate Boards
Member Illinois Association of Certified Real Estate Appraisers
Illinois Association of Real Estate Boards
National Association of Real Estate Boards
Telephone - State 3655

ERNEST H. LYONS
Real Estate Valuator
120 South La Salle Street
Chicago, Illinois

Qualifications - ERNEST H. LYONS - Realtor and Appraiser

Active experience as a real estate broker and appraiser in the Chicago Metropolitan District for the past 45 years.

Real estate broker licensed by the City of Chicago and State of Illinois.

Active Member


Former President, Vice-President and Director of the Illinois Association of Real Estate Appraisers

Former Director of the Chicago Chapter of the American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers
Former Vice-President, Director and Secretary of the Chicago Real Estate Board
Former Chairman of the Appraisal Committee of the Chicago Real Estate Board

Have acted as appraiser for -

Have made appraisals for various departments of the United States Government and others
Experience includes appraisal and brokerage of all types of real estate in the Chicago Area.

J. SOULE WARTERFIELD

Phone Central 6157 REALTOR APPRAISER 8 South Dearborn Street
Chicago

J. SOULE WARTERFIELD
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Born, Union City, Tennessee, 1888; heads real estate firm under own name; Vice President Starrett Brothers, Inc., Builders, for 16 years; has developed, financed, built and managed large office buildings, hotels, commercial properties and housing projects; has built public utility improvements and assembled large tracts of land for public and private interests; recently had charge of appraisal of all of Chicago and Cook County properties for assessment purposes and rewriting of assessment rules reflecting economic values; thirty?five years' experience in the real estate business; former member Executive Committee, National Association of Real Estate Boards and member of other committees; former Business Manager and President Chicago Real Estate Board; Secretary Illinois Association of Real Estate Boards; had charge of legislative campaigns which produced the Illinois laws on zoning, real estate corporations, real estate brokers license, neighborhood redevelopment corporations; Vice President, Chicago Building Congress; Organization Member, American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED TOWN SITE SOUTH OF OLYMPIA FIELDS BETWEEN CHICAGO HEIGHTS, ILLINOIS, AND THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD IN COOK AND WILL COUNTIES, ILLINOIS

LOCATION:

Approximately twenty-eight miles South of the Chicago Loop, largely in the South Eastern portion of Cook County.

Approximately twenty-four hundred acres.

CONTOUR:

Slightly rolling land, with enough slope and stream access for good natural drainage.

ARBORAGE:

Forest Preserve lands with heavy native woods and winding protected streams adjoin the property, much of which is largely open land. Upon one section., however, is a nursery with 30,000 half-grown elm trees.

ASSEMBLAGE:

The subject property is made up of a group of farms and homesteads assembled according to plan and adaptability to the development of a town site.

TRANSPORTATION:

Forty-five minutes from the heart of Chicago by Illinois Central Suburban Electric trains. Also bus service is available.

ARTERIAL ROADS:

Dixie Highway, Lincoln Highway, and various concrete paved major highways pass thru or are contiguous to the property.

RAILROAD AND SHIPPING FACILITIES:

The New York Central and Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Belt Line Railroads serve the area and can establish freight receiving and shipping yards in the proposed industrial area, with sidings or manufacturers.

GENERAL TAXES_:

Being outside the City of Chicago and in an area of modest land values, the tax rate should be low, as is the case with most of the suburban communities around Chicago.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Appraisers have carefully examined this property. In addition to their long experience in the real estate and building business in the Chicago Area, they are particularly familiar with the subject area. Consideration has been given to the fact that there are few, if any, comparable areas in the Chicago Metropolitan District, available for town site development, having the advantages of transportation, surroundings, topography and in the price range of this property. This land assembly is located within 10 to 30 minutes of one of the greatest industrial areas in the nation, providing excellent and extremely numerous employment opportunities.

The Appraisers have examined the maps, plats and details comprising the prospectus for the proposed development of this land, which are made a part hereof, and they are of the opinion that such a development is in accord with the highest and best use of the area.

[Editor's note: At this point, there is a chart, "American Community Builders, Inc. Cost and Taxes on Land for Town Site as of February 25, 1947," which is page 80 in the photocopy of the document. It is scanned in Photoshop, and is Record no. 4550 on the digital site.]

American Community Builders, Inc.
STATUS OF LAND FOR HOMESITE

Tract 1. (Baker Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451
Property Acquired June 6, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3079593
Subject to Unpaid taxes for balance of second installments on 1935 and 1937 and for unpaid taxes for the years 1938 and subsequent years. The principal amount of taxes for said years amounts to $351.18. Including penalties and interest said taxes will amount to approximately $550. Estimated 1946 taxes $55.
Also subject to roads and highways and. switch track rights of way, if any.

Tract 2 . (Lambrecht Deal)

Title now in Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under TrustNo. 5451
Property acquired May 6, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3079592
Subject to Taxes for 1938 and subsequent years. Principal amount of taxes for 1938 to 1945 inclusive amount to $236.76. Including penalties and interest said taxes will amount to approximately $350. Estimated 1946 taxes $35.
Also subject to roads and highways, railroad rights-of-way, etc.

Tract 3. (Chicago Heights Land Company Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451
Property acquired July 29, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3080777-3124143
Subject to Taxes for 1928 to 1940. Expect to settle these taxes through foreclosure for approximately $1715. The taxes for 1928 to 1940 amount to approximately $5,000. Principal amount of taxes for 1941 to 1945 inclusive amounts to approximately $3388.87. Including penalties and interest said taxes will amount to approximately $4500.
Subject also to first mortgage in the sum of $17,500, due July 29, 1947.
Also subject to building and zoning ordinances, rights of the public, etc. in and to premises taken for highway purposes. Also subject to unpaid special assessments, amounting in principal to $4057.99 and including penalties will amount to approximately $6900. Expect to settle this for approximately $4100.

Tract 4. (Cull Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 4403
Property acquired December 10, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3151036
Subject to Taxes for 1946. Estimated 1946 Taxes - $lOO.

Subject to Caucasian clause restriction.

Tract 5. (Demos Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451
Property acquired September 10, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3069465 - 3135902
Subject to 1946 taxes. 1946 taxes will amount to approximately $275.
Also subject to trust deed securing the sum of $30,000 due June 17, 1947, with interest at 5% per annum, easement to Texas Empire Pipeline Company to construct a line of poles and electric wires, etc., right of way for drainage, ditches, feeders and laterals, if any, rights of the State of Illinois and the public as to so much of the premises as fall in Western Avenue as now open and used and as may fall within any other road or highway; railroads, switch tracks and spurs.

Tract 6. (Lambrecht - Walker)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451
Property acquired August 6, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3094735
Subject to Taxes for 1928 and subsequent years. Principal amount of taxes for 1925 and 1940 inclusive amounts to $569.06. Expect to settle through tax foreclosure for approximately $200. Plus penalties and interest will amount to approximately $250. Taxes for 1941 to 1945 will amount to approximately $193.28. Estimated 1946 taxes $45. Subject also to roads and highways.

Tract 7. (Lustfeldt Deal)

This deal being closed through escrow with the Chicago Title & Trust Company as escrowee, escrow made on November 6, 1946, escrow No. 154348.

Deeds have been deposited by the Lustfeldt heirs and the widow, also the balance of the purchase price, the deeds covering the interest of the above and conveying it to The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451. Escrow is still pending, awaiting deposit by two minor heirs of deeds covering a one-sixth interest subject to the dower rights of widow. Understand from the attorney for seller that these deeds should be deposited within the next week or ten days.

C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. - 3054263 and 3055477.

Subject to 1946 taxes which will amount to approximately $550.

Subject also to roads and highways, rights of the public, grants to Prairie Oil and Gas Company to maintain and operate pipeline for oil, etc.

Tract 8. (Madsen Deal)

Property acquired September 9, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3091504
Subject to 1946 taxes which will amount to approximately $160.
Also subject to first mortgage in the sum of $10,000, due September 9, 1947, with interest at 4% per annum payable at maturity. Also subject to easement for private right of way to and from public highway, rights of the public and State of Illinois as to so much of premises used for road and highway purposes, rights of the Public Service Company of Northern Illinois to maintain electric pole lines, etc., also dedication for public street to be known as Hickory Street.

Tract 9. (Marthaler Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust known as Trust No. 5323, to an undivided 1965/2193rds of premises in question. Deed for remainder of premises deposited on September 11, 1946, in escrow with the Trust Company of Chicago under escrow No. 779 to be delivered when the balance of purchase price is paid as provided for in said escrow, also mortgage covering premises in question deposited on same date in escrow No. 778 to be delivered when balance of the purchase price is paid as provided for in said escrow.
Dates various of the above interests acquired range from May 2, 1946, to October 9, 1946.
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3124146

There are unpaid taxes for 1936 to 1940 on part of the premises in question, including penalties, amounting to approximately $1400. Also subject to 1945 taxes amounting to approximately $100 on one parcel of said premises. The taxes for 1946 on all of said parcels will amount to approximately $435.

Also subject to first mortgage in the sum of $25,457.52, due July 1, 1947, with 4% interest payable at maturity. Also subject to roads and highways.

Tract 11. (Muff Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451
Property acquired September 16, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3100028 - 3139677
Subject to Taxes for the year 1946 which will amount to approximately $185.34.
Subject also to first mortgage in the sum of $12,000 due September 16, 1947, with interest at 4% per annum payable at maturity, roads and highways and railroad rights of way.

Tract 10. (McClure Deal)

Contract for purchase of said premises entered into April 25, 1946. This deal not as yet closed, awaiting clearance of objection with reference to an old mortgage on said premises. Am advised by attorney for seller that this deal should be closed within the next two weeks.

C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. - 3079982.

Subject to taxes for 1928 and subsequent years. Principal amount of taxes for 1928 to 1940 amount t o $5730.25 . Expect to settle these through foreclosure proceeding for approximately $2,000. Principal taxes for 1941 to 1945 inclusive amount to $1894.54. Including penalties and interest said taxes will amount to $2368.17. 1946 taxes will amount to approximately $450.

Also subject to unpaid special assessments, principal amount - $1451.31, together with penalties and interest - $3,000. To settle same expect to pay out approximately $1500.

Also subject to building and zoning ordinances, rights of the public, etc. as to premises taken for streets and alleys, 20' building line as shown on plat of subdivision.

Tract 12. (Schubert Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451
Property acquired September 13, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 3083971-3137544
Subject to Unpaid taxes for 1928 and subsequent years. Principal amount of taxes for 1928 to 1940 amounts to $4423.08. Expect to settle same for approximately $1600.
Principal taxes for 1941 to 1945 amount to $1209.26. Including penalties and interest said taxes will amount to approximately $1350.
Also subject to unpaid special assessments - principal amounting to $2215.75, which special assessments including penalties will amount to approximately $4400. Expect to settle for $2300
Subject also to easements for highway purposes and grants and easements to Will Cook Construction Company to maintain and operate gas mains and pipes, etc., roads and highways.

Tract 13. (Wilson Deal)

Contract for purchase of said premises entered into on May 13, 1946.

Title in Percy Wilson, as Trustee under Trust known as Realty Security Trust.

Opinion of Title No. 3082886.

Subject to taxes for 1945 which amount to $216.78 and 1946 which will amount to approximately $220.

Also subject to rights of the public, roads and highways, rights of the Public Service Company of Northern Illinois, also easement for private right of way.

Parcel 14. (First National Bank Deal)

Contract entered into April 30, 1946, also modification agreement entered into July 30, 1946.

Opinion Nos. 3150173 and 3151691.

Title in The First National Bank of Chicago.

Subject to taxes for the Year 1946 which amount to approximately $2400.

Subject to easements to Prairie Oil and Gas Company and Prairie Pipeline Company to operate and maintain pipes, easement for private road and roads and highways.

Parcel 15. (Demos Deal)

See 5 above.

Parcel 16. (Ziebell Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 5451
Deal closed September 20, 1946
Opinion No. of C.T.&T.Co. 3140391
Subject to Taxes for the year 1946 which will amount to approximately $140.
Subject to Rights of the public, etc., roads and highways, ditches and tile drains, easement for right of way.

Parcel 17. (Weishaar Deal)

Contract entered into October 7, 1946. Deal not yet closed.

Title now in - William F. Weishaar and Tillie, his wife, jointly.

C.T.&T.Co, Opn. No. - 3163331.

Subject to taxes for the year 1946. Subject also to mortgages to be cleared when deal closed; rights of public, etc. in premises falling within roads and highways, easement for private road to public highway.

Parcel 18. (Shinner Deal)

Title now in The Trust Company of Chicago, as Trustee under Trust No. 4403
Date deal closed June 26, 1946
C.T.&T.Co. Opn. No. 20895970 - 31089888
Subject to Taxes - for 1928 to 1945.

Subject to Principal taxes for 1928 to 1940 amount to $18,744.88, including taxes on the following lots for 1928 to 1940 which are not part of the Shinner purchase but are odd lots purchased from various other parties in the same subdivision, as follows:

Lot 10 in Block 13
Lots 1, 2 and 3 in Block 17.
Lots 13, 14 and 15 in Block 29.

Expect to settle these for approximately $6500. The taxes for 1941 t o 1945 inclusive amount to approximately $6250. Including penalties these taxes would amount to approximately $7813.
1946 taxes will amount to approximately $1770.
Also under 18 are the following lots which are not part of Shinner purchase but are in same subdivision:

Lot 7 in Block 1.
Lots 11 and 12 in Block 4
Lot 25 in Block 11
Lot 13 in Block 12.

The Shinner property is also subject to first mortgage in the sum of $15,000 due June 26, 1947, with interest at 5% per annum payable at maturity, also subject to easements over rear 10' of lots.

Lot 10 in Block 13 is also subject to Caucasian restriction.

Lots 1, 2 and 3 in Block 17 and 13, 14 and 15 in Block 29 included in the above tax figures and are also subject to Caucasian condition.

In addition to the above, the following are odd lots in said subdivision title to which is held by The Trust Company of Chicago as Trustee under Trust No. 4403:

Lot 33 in Block 5 - Subject to taxes for 1931 and subsequent years. The general taxes for 1931 to 1945 inclusive amount to $35 including penalties. Taxes for 1946 estimated at $1.
Lot 23 in Block 11 - Subject to taxes for the years 1932 and subsequent years. Taxes for 1932 to 1945 including penalties amount to approximately $40 and taxes for the year 1946 approximately $2.40.
Lot 13 in Block 12 - Subject to taxes for the year 1946 which amount to approximately $2.25.
Lot 7 in Block 1 - Subject to 1946 taxes which will amount to approximately $2.25.
Lots 11 and 12 in Block 4 - Subject to taxes for 1946. Taxes for 1946 will amount to approximately $2.

February 25, 1947
American Community Builders, Inc.

PARK FOREST OPERATING ESTIMATES
(Mortgage Areas Under FHA Section 608)

The following, data explain how the various operating expense items were computed for the nine mortgage areas shown below:

Items Other Than Decorating

Area No. of Units % Distribution
A 290 9.63
B 370 12.29
C 260 8.64
D 384 12.76
E 404 13.42
F 220 7.31
G 190 6.31
H 502 16.68
J 390 12.96
3,010 100.00

Decorating

Area No. of Rooms % Distribution
A 1,522 9.85
B 1,956 12.66
C 1,261 8.16
D 2,027 13.12
E 2,133 13.81
F 1,022 6.62
G 926 6.00
H 2,554 16.54
J 2,045 13.24
15,446 100.00

In all computations, hours of work were converted into required number of personnel on the basis of 1,904 hours as the equivalent of a man-year of work. This figure is derived on the basis of a 40-hour week less two?weeks vacation, one week sick leave and several legal holidays (56 hours). It results in the following effective hourly rates:

Annual Salary Effective Hourly Rate
$3,600 1.89
3,120 1.64
2,600 1.36
2,100 1.10
1,800 .94

2-27-47 [Editor's note: RENTING belongs here, and can be found to the right. Further to the right is Lighting and miscellaneous power.]

MANAGEMENT

Telephone and Telegraph $2,250
Legal and audit 2,750
Office Expense 5,000
$10,000
Salaries
Manager $12,000
Secretary 2,600
File Clerk 1,800
Rental Manager 4,800
Lease Clerk 2,080
Chief Accountant 5,200
Accountant 3,600
Bookkeeping, Machine Operator 2,400
Payroll Clerk 2,400
Ledger Clerk 2,400
Clerk Stenographer 2,080
Purchasing Agent 3,600
Storekeeper 2,400
Clerk Stenographer 2,080
Maintenance Superintendant 7,200
Maintenance Aide 2,400
Clerk Typist 2,080
Switchboard Operator 2,080
63,200
Total $73,200

JANITORIAL

Computed on basis of $1.00 per dwelling unit per year.

3,010 x $1.00 = $3,010

RENTING

Credit Reports
400 x 2.50
$1,000
Brochures and Advertising 1,500
Photographs and AR
Miscellaneous
500
Total $3,000

LIGHTING AND MISCELLANEOUS POWER

Street Lighting 14,000 kwh per month @ $.03 per kwh $5,040
Miscellaneous Power 860
Total $5,900

Collection 3,010 x 1/4 hour per week x 52 hours 39,130 hours
Removal from site 1,500 hours
Total 40,630 hours
40,630 hours x $.94 = $38,192.20
Rounded to $38,200

OPERATING PAYROLL

Janitorial Time
Dwelling Unit turnover
450 X 12
5,400 hours
Cleaning walks - 1 hour per 10,000 square feet twice per week
(678,000 square feet divided by 10,000 x 104)
Snow removal (assume 10 falls of 4 inches each):
    Power cleaning 1,087,000 square feet @1.5 hours for 10,000 square feet per fall
    Hand cleaning 678,000 square feet @ 7 hours for 10,000 square feet per fall
1,630 hours
Total Janitorial Hours 4,746 hours
18,827 - 9.89 man years

Grounds Time

Tenant maintenance areas 3,01.0 x .055 acres per dwelling unit x 72 hours per acre 11,920 hours
Primary areas 3,010 x .015 acres per dwelling unit x 540 hours per acre 24,381 hours
Secondary areas 3,010 x .021 acres per dwelling unit x 180 hours per acre

Total Grounds Hours

11,378 hours
47,679 = 25.04 man years

The above time requirements were converted into the following personnel.

1 Head Janitor $2,100
6 Janitors @ $1,800 16,200
$18,300
1 Head Gardener 3,120
1 Gardener 2,600
6 Laborers @ $2,080 12,480
29 Laborers @ $173.33 per month for 7 mos. 35,186
53,386
Total Operating Payroll $71,686
Rounded To $71,500

GARBAGE AND OTHER REFUSE REMOVAL

The analysis below shows, how decorating and shade costs were computed building type and for the nine mortgage areas in total. The total decorating cost for all mortgage areas was apportioned to each area in proportion to the number of rooms as shown on the first page of this analysis. The shade costs are reflected in total under "Furniture and Furnishings".

Type Labor Materials Total Shades per
Building
Number of
Buildings
Total-All Areas
Decorating
Total-All Areas
Shades
A $67.20 $25.93 $93.43 $4.63 61 $5,699.23 $282.43
B 82.50 30.53 113.03 5.24 38 4,295.14 199.12
C 150.00 57.63 207.63 9.37 36 7,474.68 337.32
D 141.75 55.33 197.08 9.06 81 15,963.48 733.48
E 216.75 84.73 301.48 13.49 53 15,978.44 714.97
F 211.50 83.40 294.90 13.18 111 32,733.90 1,462.98
G 262.50 107.25 369.75 17.00 27 9,983.25 459.00
H 285.00 111.84 396.84 17.62 62 24,604.08 1,092.44
J 82.50 30.53 113.03 5.50 28 3,164.84 154.00
K 82.50 30.53 113.03 5.50 54 6,103.62 297.00
L 67.50 25.93 93.43 4.63 69 6,446.67 319.47
M 82.50 30.53 113.03 5.24 57 6,442.71 298.68
N 67.50 25.93 93.43 4.63 19 1,775.17 87.97
P 82.50 30.53 113.03 5.24 34 3,843.02 178.16
Q 162.00 62.23 224.23 11.11 22 4,933.06 244.42
R 229.50 88.16 317.66 15.74 29 9,212.14 456.46
Total $158,653.43 $7,318.28
Rounded to $158,700 $7,300

REPAIRS

The following routine maintenance workload of 15,150 hours is the equivalent of 7.9 man-years as itemized below:

Routine Workload in Hours

Carpentry 2,800
Roofing 700
Tile and Concrete 1,400
Glazing 1,400
Locks and Hardware 1,600
Electrical 2,400
Refrigeration (Utility Company service of gas, refrigeration) 200
Plumbing (Hot water heaters inspected twice per year by Utiltity Company) 3,600
Heating (Inspection and service by Utility Company) 400
Ranges (All adjustments by Utility Company) 500
Miscellaneous 150
Total hours 15,150

DECORATING

EXTERMINATING

Maintenance Payroll Requirements

1 Head Carpenter $3,600
2 Carpenters @ $3,120 6,240
Glazer 3,120
1Head Electrician 3,600
1Head Plumber 3,600
2 Assistant Plumbers @ $3,126 6,240
$26,400
Add 1/4 for materials 6,600
Total $33,000

                                                                            Inspection

1/6 hour x 2 men x 3 times per year x 3,010 units 3,010 hours

Application of Insecticide

1/2 hour x 2 men x 2 times per year x 600 units infested 1,200
Total 4,210 hours
4,210 hours = 2 men at $2,100 $4,200
Possible overtime 500
Supplies @ $.50 per dwelling unit 1,505
Total $6,205
Rounded to $6,200

INSURANCE

Fire Insurance: Assume insurable value of $6,000 per dwelling unit
at mutual rate of $.15/$100 or 9 per dwelling unit x 3,010
$27.090.00
O.L.T. liability insurance x$50,000/$300,000 $1.25
per dwelling unit
3,762.50
Workmens Compensation*:
Clerical $.05 x $44,400
22.20
Building Operation $ .94 x $28,300 266.02
Garbage Removal $2.55 x $38,200 974.10
Landscape $1.64 x $53,200 872.48
Carpentry $2.95 x $12,960 382.32
Electrical $1.32 x $3,600 47.52
Plumbing $1.26 x $9,840 123.98
Exterminators $.94 x $4,700 44.18
Decorating $2.33 x $108,888 2,537.09
5,26989
Less 25% 1,317.47
3,952.42
Miscellaneous 500.00
Total $35,304.92
Rounded to $35,300.00
*Workmen's Compensation based on maximum permitted of $100 per man per week.

GROUNDS

Tenant maintained areas:
3,010 x .055 acres per dwelling unit x $10 materials per acre
$1,655.50
Project maintained areas:
3,010 x .015 acres per dwelling unit x $80 material per acre                        
3,612.00
Secondary project areas:
3,010 x .021 acres per dwelling unit x $20 material per acre
1,264.20
Parking bays:
$201,839 capital cost x .02
5,045.98
Total $11,577.68
Rounded to $11,600.00

FURNITURE AND FURNISHINGS

Shades (see details under "Decorating" above] $7,300
Furniture 1,500
Operating service and maintenance equipment 4,500
Motor vehicle operation 1,000
Motor vehicle replacement 1,000
Playground and miscellaneous 1,500
Total $16,800

REAL ESTATE TAXES
3,010 X $8 per unit per month $288,960

SOCIAL SECURITY TAXES

$303,768 payroll x 4 % $12,150.72
Rounded to $12,200
Note: Note that the payroll for Social Security Tax purposes Is based on an amount not exceeding $3,000 per year per man.

REPLACEMENT RESERVE

(Factors Used Are From FHA Rental Housing Manual Except for Refrigerators and Laundry Tubs)

Item Life of
Item
% Subject to
Replacement
Gas Ranges $60 12 $180,600 90 .0685 $11,134
Gas Refrigerators 120 12 361,200 90 .0685 22,268
Kitchen Sinks 55 20 165,550 100 .0354 5,860
Lavatories and Fittings 40 20 120,400 100 .0354 4,262
Toilets and Valves 50 20 150,500 100 .0354 5,328
Tubs and Fittings 75 20 225,750 100 .0354 7,992
Electric Fixtures 30 12 90,300 100 .0685 6,186
Dwelling Gas Furnaces 260 25 752,600 90 .0257 20,113
Automatic Hot Water Heaters 50 15 150,500 100 .0518 7,796
Laundry Tubs and Fittings 50 20 150,500 100 .0354 5,328
Roofing and Flashing 100 25 301,000 80 .0257 6,189
Rough Plumbing 300 30 903,000 80 .0194 14,015
Street Lighting Standards 400 x 25 12 10,000 100 .0685 685
Total
Rounded to
$117,156
$117,200

This page blank.

SUMMARY STATEMENT of COST ESTIMATES NINE AREAS

AREA A
SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES

1. Land Improvements
New Utilities: On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $86,250
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 8,600
3. Sanitary Sewers 18,733
4. Water Supply 13,134
5. Street Lighting 6,500
6. Storm Sewer 10,345
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 10,208
8. Electric Underground Service 8,932
9. Gas Service 11,484
Total $174,186
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 45,890
Total Land Improvements $220,076

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (290) 2,196,460
3. Land - 30.75 acres @ $2,000 61,500
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 3,560
2. Roads 9,203
3. Sanitary Sewer 6,245
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 19,567
5. Water Service - General 49,426
6. Police and Fire Alarm - General 2,552
7. Storm Sewer 6,630
8. Intercepting Sewer 21,759
118,933
+10% 11,893
130,826
192,326
RLS 3-7-47

AREA B
ESTIMATED REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $80,829
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 7,000
3. Sanitary Sewers 35,426
4. Water Supply 16,418
5. Street Lighting 6,500
6. Storm Sewer 9,636
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 8,940
8. Electric Service Underground 11,396
9. Gas Service 14,652
Total $190,293
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 55,250
Total for Land Improvements $245,543

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (370) 2,850,816
3. Land - 1,631,757 S.F. @ $.168 per S.F.
40.2 acres @ 2,000
80,400
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 2,750
2. Roads 29,625
3. Sanitary Sewer 6,085
4. Sanitary Sewers 31,136
5. Water 60,927
6. Street Lighting and Police and Fire Alarm 7,597
7. Storm Sewer 10,292
8. Intercepting Sewer 27,750
176,123
+10% 11,893
17,612
193,735
Total Cost $274,135
                                         2-19-47

AREA C
SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities: On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $52,250
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 4,600
3. Sanitary Sewers 12,778
4. Water Supply 5,529
5. Street Lighting 3,500
6. Storm Sewer -
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 9,152
8. Electric Underground Service 8,008
9. Gas Service 10,296
Total $106,113
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 36,384
Total Land Improvements 142,947

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (260) 1,872,066
3. Land - 24.90 acres @ 2,000 49,800
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 2,578
2. Roads 22,870
3. Sanitary Sewer 4,205
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 17,542
5. Water Service - General 42,817
6. Police and Fire Alarm 2,288
7. Storm Sewer 6,560
8. Intercepting Sewer 19,500
118,360
+10% 11,836
130,196
179,996
RLS
3-7-47

SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities: On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $85,382
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 8,200
3. Sanitary Sewer 25,103
4. Water Supply 15,094
5. Street Lighting 7,500
6. Storm Sewer 14,119
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 10,842
8. Electric Underground Service 11,827
9. Gas Service 15,206
Total $193,273
Total Land Improvements $260,629

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (384) 2,969,890
3. Land - 48,00 acres @ 2,000 96,000
Off-site Costs
1. Landscaping 5,499
2. Roads 40,222
3. Sanitary Sewer 13,245
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 25,909
5. Water Service - General 66,165
6. Police and Fire Alarm 3,379
7. Storm Sewer 16,013
8. Intercepting Sewer 28,800
199,232
+10% 19,923
219,155
315,155

RLS
3/7/47

American Community Builders, Inc.

AREA D
This Information is located far to the right.

American Community Builders, Inc.

AREA E
SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities: On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $96,219
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 8,600
3. Sanitary Sewers 25,611
4. Water Supply 13,909
5. Street Lighting 10,750
6. Storm Sewer 11,531
7. Water - Inside Distribution 12,602
8. Electric Underground Service 12,443
9. Gas Service 15,998
Total 207,663
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 64,907
Total Land Improvements 272,570

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (404) 3,079,948
3. Land - 42.54 acres @ 2,000 90,480
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 6,387
2. Roads 63,171
3. Sanitary Sewer 10,273
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 27,259
5. Water Service - General 73,062
6. Police and Fire Alarm 3,555
7. Storm Sewer - General 28,022
8. Intercepting Sewer 30,300
242,029
+10% 24,203
266,232
356,712

American Community Builders, Inc.

AREA F
SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities - On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $46,132
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 4,200
3. Sanitary Sewer 10,524
4. Water Supply 3,963
5. Street Lighting 3,500
6. Storm Sewer 7,346
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 7,744
8. Electric Underground Service 6,776
9. Gas Service 8,712
Total $98,627
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 35,904
Total Land Improvements 134,531

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (220) 1,536,054
3. Land - 20.02 acres @ 2,000 40,040
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 13,802
2. Roads 56,637
3. Sanitary Sewer -
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 14,810
5. Water Service - General 36,163
6. Police and Fire Alarm 1,936
7. Storm Sewer 7,555
8. Intercepting Sewer 16,500
147,437
+10% 14,744
161,181
202,221

BLS
3/7/47

AREA G
SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities: On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $44,181
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 4,200
3. Sanitary Sewers 8,728
4. Water Supply 4,158
5. Street Lighting 5,500
6. Storm Sewer 1,220
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 6,688
8. Electric Underground Service 5,852
9. Gas Service 7,524
Total $88,051
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 33,078
Total Land Improvements $121,129

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (190)
3. Land - 18.54 acres @ 2,000 37,080
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 11,878
2. Roads 61,4991
3. Sanitary Sewer 793
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 12,820
5. Water Service - General 30,388
6. Police and Fire Alarm 1,672
7. Storm Sewer General 9,589
8. Intercepting Sewer 14,250
142,881
+10% 14,288
167,191
204,149

RLS
3/7/47

American Community Builders, Inc.

AREA H
SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities: On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $110,344
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 13,000
3. Sanitary Sewers 28,581
4. Water Supply 16,728
5. Street Lighting 9,250
6. Storm Sewer 10,453
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 14,714
8. Electric Underground Service 15,462
9. Gas Service 19,880
Total $238,412
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 80,780
Total Land Improvements $319,192

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (502) 3,744,194
3. Land - 50.51 acres @ 2,000 101,020
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 10,268
2. Roads 52,417
3. Sanitary Sewer 7,768
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 33,867
5. Water Service - General 82,349
6. Police and Fire Alarm 4,418
7. Storm Sewer 38,009
8. Intercepting Sewer 37650
266,746
+10% 26,675
293,421
394,441

RLS
3/7/47

American Community Builders, Inc.

AREA J
SUMMARY OF COST ESTIMATES
1. Land Improvements
New Utilities: On-Site
1. Roads, Curbs, Walks $77,420
2. Tot Yards - Playgrounds 8,600
3. Sanitary Sewer 28,784
4. Water Supply 10,517
5. Street Lighting 8,500
6. Storm Sewer 10,707
7. Water - Inside - Distribution 12,600
8. Electric Underground Service 12,012
9. Gas Service 15,444
Total $184,584
10. Landscape Work (On-Site) 57,721
Total for Land Improvements $242,305

2. Construction
1. Dwellings (390) 2,949,370
3. Land - 39.92 acres @ 2,000 79,840
Off-site Costs:
1. Landscaping 4,872
2. Roads 69,066
3. Sanitary Sewer 6,996
4. Sanitary Sewers - General 26,314
5. Water Service - General 69,263
6. Police and Fire Alarm 3,432
7. Storm Sewer 13,595
8. Intercepting Sewer 29,250
222,794
+10% 22,279
245,073
324,913

RLS
3/7/47

OVERALL REQUIREMENTS
1. Land Acquisition $1,088,995.59
Planning Budget up to commencement of construction 250,000.00
3. F.H.A. filing fees 82,345.00
Cash Working Capital $1,833,066.59
Provided to date 656,831.48
$1,176,235.11

- Footnotes -
1. Includes 2,376.294 acres - Required for 608 program, commercial and miscellaneous approximately 500 acres.
2. Includes items approximately 100,000 to 125,000 which may be allowable as construction cost.
3. This item included and allowable as cost in FHA mortgage insurance submission.
4. This item is set up in conformance with FICA, regulations requiring cash working capital equal to 1-1/2% of the amount of proposed mortgages. It is deposited with mortgage or under its control for the purpose of meeting the cost of equipping and renting the development subsequent to completion of construction. Or it may be allocated during construction to the accruals for taxes, mortgage insurance premiums, hazard insurance premiums and assessments, etc. Any balance not so used must be returned to mortgagor upon completion of the development to the satisfaction of FHA.

[Editor's note: At this point in the plan, two charts were inserted. One is "Park Forest Operating Estimates (Mortgage Areas Under FHA Section 608)." This chart is page 100 in the photocopy of the document. It is Record no. 4552 on the digital site, "Park Forest: An American Planned Community." The other is "Park Forest Rental Areas, Comparative Data on Estimated Resources, Requirements and Operations." It is page 99 in the photocopy of the document. It is Record #4551 on the digital site.]

BIOGRAPHY OF PHILIP M. KLUTZNICK

(President, American Community Builders Inc.)

Born in Kansas City, Mo., July 9, 1907.

Attended Universities of Kansas and of Nebraska, receiving LL.B. from Creighton University, Omaha, in 1929.

Member of Omaha law firm of Beber., Klutznick, Beber, and Kaplan and maintains law office in Chicago.

Commissioner of the Federal Public Housing Authority from May, 1944, to June 30, 1946.

Has served at various timed as assistant administrator of the National Authority in charge of war housing operations, regional representative of the NHA, assistant administrator in charge of the Home Use Service, regional coordinator for the Division of Defense Housing, General counsel of Omaha Housing Authority.

Former special assistant to the U. S. Attorney General in slum clearance and housing matters.

Member of the National Council, Boy Scouts of America.

Member of the Board of Governors, National Association of Housing Officials.

Member of the American Institute of Planners, the Society for the Advancement of Management and the American Society for Public Administration.

Member of the Board of Directors, National Public Housing Conference.

Outstanding activity in Jewish affairs including membership in the executive committee of the National Jewish Welfare Board and the B'nai B'rith; president, West Central Region of the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds; president, Omaha Board of Jewish Education; president, B'nai B'rith district No. 6; chairman of Omaha Jewish Philanthropies.

BIOGRAPHY OF JERROLD LOEBL

Vice President, American Community Builders Inc.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, September 2, 1899

B.S., Armour Institute of Technology (Now Illinois Institute of Technology), 1921.

M.A., Armour Institute of Technology, 1922.

Winner of Annual Art Institute Traveling Scholarship, 1921.

President of the Chicago Building Congress.

Past President, American Institute of Architects, Chicago Chapter.

Former Director, Dept. of Architecture, Armour Institute of Technology.

Member and Secretary of State of Illinois Architects' Examining Committee

Architect and Director of Temple Sholom, Chicago.

Vice-Chairman of National Urban Planning Committee, The American Institute of Architects.

Chairman of the Board, Public Housing Association, Chicago.

Director of National Public Housing Conference.

Regional Chairman Architects ' Advisory Committee, Federal Public Housing Authority.

Member of Northmoor Country Club, Standard Club; Builders' Club.

Member of Mayor Kelly's Advisory Housing Committee, Chairman of Subcommittee on Apartments.

Member of Architectural and planning firm of Loebl & Schlossman since 1925.

Has resided for twenty years at 5861 Sheridan Road, Chicago.

BIOGRAPHY OF NATHAN MANILOW

(Treasurer, American Community Builders Inc.)

Born April 10, 1898, at Baltimore, MD

Completed Chicago Law School.

Organized own business, Realty Investment Co., financing real estate and actual building, 1918-1922.

Sold interest in National Lamp and Furniture Co. , 1924 to return to the building business exclusively, and has been in the building and financial business ever since.

Constructed. Jeffrey Manor, large scale Chicago Housing development.

Head of Manilow Construction Co., 1937, specializing in reorganization of industrial companies and refunding of their capital structures.

Also specialized in municipal financing in collaboration with Chapman and Cutler, attorneys of national reputation in municipal and industrial financing.

Has handled more than $60,000,000 of financing serving such cities as Grand Rapids, Mich., American Seating Co., Jahncke Service Co., Inc., and others.

BIOGRAPHY OF HART PERRY
(Secretary, American Community Builders Inc.)

M. A. in political science and public administration, University of Chicago, 1940.

Named special assistant to the commissioner of the Federal Public Housing Authority, acting as general expediter in the veterans' temporary housing program, May, 1946 - Resigned Sept. 1946.

Served in World War II, enlisting as private and separated as captain, Office of Strategic Service.

Was research assistant to Paul H, Douglas, professor of Economics, University of Chicago.

Served as administrative assistant, Boytown Ordnance Works, Boytown, Tex., from Nov. 1940 to July, 1941.

Was administrative assistant, Region II of Division of Defense Housing Coordination, July 1941 to Feb. 1942.

Was senior Housing Specialist, national housing agency in what is now Region III of that agency. Prepared housing program to meet the housing needs of war workers in this area from Feb. 1942 to Feb. 1943.

BIOGRAPHY OF CHARLES WALDMANN
(Board of Directors, American Community Builders, Inc.)

Educated at Royal University for Engineers, Budapest, Hungary, receiving degrees in mechanical, electrical and civil engineering, 1918 to 1920.

Designed vegetable drying machinery, plant layout etc. for the largest vegetable dehydrating plant in Central Europe while in Budapest.

Installed several wood or waste fired isolated section gas-producing plants in Budapest.

Designer of switchboards, panelboards, industrial. control equipment.

Development work in brush contact switches, switch gear and high tension substation equipment design.

Responsible for electrical and mechanical installation in numerous industrial plants in this country.

Designed, prepared, specifications for mechanical equipment for such structures as United Cigar Co.'s manufacturing plants, Curtis Aeroplane Mfg, Co., etc.

Employed as senior chief engineer of the planning section, Resettlement Division, Greenhills Project, in connection with the preparation of the mechanical and electrical plans and specifications for the town project which included 1,000 family units, school building, complete utility system etc.

Served as head of electrical and mechanical utility system, NHA; had general charge and supervision of all comparative utility cost analysis prepared in USHA. This involved 2,500 community projects, 250,000 dwelling units.

Served as principal engineer of Detroit area office 6f the FPHA, solving serious problems in the development of the wartime city in the vicinity of Willow Run Bomber plant.

Member of the National Professional Engineers Society and Professional Engineer societies of New York, Michigan, and the District of Columbia.

Member of the Society of American Military Engineers, Master Electricians Societies in New York, Bayonne, N. J, and Syracuse, N. Y.

BIOGRAPHY OF CARROLL SWEET, SR.
(Board of Directors, American Community Builders Inc.)

Born June 24, 1877, at Grand Rapids, Michigan.

A.B. Yale, 1899.

Was senior housing priorities examiner, Region III, National housing Administration, 1941-1943.

President, A. P. Callahan Co., Chicago; L. B. Harris Co., Chicago.

Was president, and director, Grand Rapids Lumber Co.

Participated with Nathan Manilow and Associates in construction of Jeffrey Manor and other large scale housing projects.

Served as president, Morris Plan Industrial Bank (1917-1927) and vice-president, Old National Bank (1915-1929), both of Grand Rapids.

Set outstanding record as manager, Home Owners Loan, Corp., District C (western Michigan), 1933 to 1938.

Has been president, Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce; secretary, Grand Rapids YMCA; president, Michigan Hardwood Lumber Dealers Association; president, Michigan Tourist and Resort Association, executive secretary, Michigan Real Estate Association; director, Kent Country Club.

Member-Alpha Delta Phi, Skull and Bones, Yale.

BIOGRAPHY OF NORMAN J. SCHLOSSMAN
(Staff architect, American Community Builders Inc.)

Born Chicago, Illinois, March 13, 1901.

Graduated from Hyde Park High School.

Graduated from Armour Institute of Technology (now Illinois Institute of Technology,) B.S., 1921.

Awarded Hutchinson Medal, Armour Institute of Technology, 1921.

European study, 1921-22.

Associated with Coolidge and Hodgdon, Architects, 1922-25.

Member of The American Institute of Architects.

Director of Chicago Chapter; former Secretary, Chicago Chapter, The American Institute of Architects, 1944-46.

Member of Committee on Architectural Competitions, The American Institute of Architects.

Chairman, of the Building Code Commission of Highland Park, Illinois.

Director, Young Men's Jewish Council, Chicago.

Director, Lower North Center, Chicago.

Partner in firm of Loebl & Schlossman, architects, engineers, and planners, since 1925 .

Representative projects:

Residence: 1415 Dean Avenue, Highland Park, Illinois

BIOGRAPHY OF ELBERT PEETS
Town Planner, American Community Builders, Inc.)

Born in Cleveland, Ohio.

Father an artist - as is brother.

Was graduated from Western Reserve University (Cleveland) and from the Harvard School of Landscape Architecture and City Planning.

Won the Charles Eliot travelling fellowship and spent a year studying park design and city planning in Europe.

Listed in "Who's Who" as a landscape architect.

Collaborated with Werner Hegemann, leading German planner, in making first studies for the village of Kohler, Wisconsin, and also in planning Washington Highland, residential suburb of Milwaukee.

Published a book with Hegemann on civic art, recognized as the most authoritative historical and critical work on that subject.

Planned the town of Greendale, near Milwaukee, in association with Jacob Crane, of Chicago, for Dr. Rex Tugwell's Resettlement Administration.

Named chief of the Site Planning Section, U. S. Housing Authority.

Returned to private practice in 1943 as consultant, in city and site planning, but first commission dealt with destruction of cities in connection with a series of lectures for men being trained as "briefers" for army and navy bombardiers.

Prepared city plan report for San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 1939; continues to serve as adviser.

Other work for William Wrigley Estate at Catalina Island.

Has written for Nation, New Republic, and. American Mercury in addition to technical journals.

BIOGRAPHY OF RICHARD M. BENNETT
(Architectural Consultant, American Community Builders Inc.)

Born in Braddock, Pa., reared in Youngstown, Ohio.

Worked for an architect mid in building construction while in high school.

Attended Harvard College and the Harvard Graduate School of Design, winning a travelling fellowship for study in Europe.

Has experience in architects' offices in New York and Boston.

Has teaching experience at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Vassar, Columbia, Pratt Institute and Yale.

Named Professor of Design and head of the department at Yale.

Won competition for an Art Center at Wheaton College while in own office with Caleb Hornbostel.

Wrote a novel on Utopia called the "First to Awaken" as a collaborator of Granville Hicks.

BIOGRAPHY OF CARROLL SWEET, JR.
(Assistant to the President, American Community Builders Inc.)

Affiliated with Grand Rapids Metallcraft Corp. 1935 to 1936.

Supervisor of vocational training program, National Youth Administration, Kent and Ionia Counties in Michigan.

Served as U.S. Naval Officer, called to active duty in 1940; Assistant Damage Control Officer, USS Ranger, aircraft carrier Commanding Officer, USS SC738, operating in Coral Sea, North coast of New Guinea, Commanding Officer; USS Kyne, escorting supply group operating with Third and Fifth Fleet fast carrier task forces.

BIOGRAPHY OF ALLAN S. HARRISON
Head of Construction Division, American Community Builders Inc.)

Trained as civil engineer, New York University and, Columbia University.

Assistant Engineer, engineering department, New York Central Railroad, 1912-1917.

World War I, corps of engineers, AEF, 1917-1919.

Assistant Resident engineer, U. S. Shipping Board, on dry dock construction, 1919-1920.

Resident engineer, engineering department - New York Central Railroad, in charge of construction, electric zone, 1920-1922.

Superintendent of construction, Emil Diebitsch, Inc., in charge of construction of telephone and school buildings, New York, 1922-1926.

General superintendent of construction, T. E. Rhoades Construction Co.; general supervision of cooperative apartments, upper east side, New York City at a construction cost of $12,000,000, 1926-1932.

Engineer and superintendent of construction on Schinasi Baynelmiel Hastahanisi Hospital for the Turkish government, Manisa, Turkey, 1932-1934.

Senior engineer, suburban resettlement, U. S. Government, large scale subsidized housing projects, 1934-1935.

Director of construction for A. S. Freed interests; in charge of construction of "Buckingham", one of the pioneer large scale housing projects, Arlington County, Virginia, 1935-1938.

Director of public housing, New York City; responsible for design, construction, and management of approximately $100,000,000 of subsidized low rental housing in New York, 1938-1941.

Supervised construction of naval repair base, Londonberry, Northern Ireland; Naval repair base, Rosneath, Scotland; seaplane base. Stranraer, Scotland; and approximately 100 miles of pipeline from Old Kilpatrick to Finnart, Scotland., including four tank farms-totaling approximately $40,000,000 in construction, 1941-1943.

Served in World War II as major, then lieutenant colonel as deputy director of engineering on Admiral Mountbatten's staff, Southeast Asia Command.

Served also as engineer member of petrol, oil and lubricants committee, 1943-1945.

Returned to New York Housing authority from which leave of absence has been granted for war work.

BIOGRAPHY OF RICHARD L. SENIOR
(Field Construction Superintendent, American Community Builders, Inc.)

Born in New York City, 1895.

Registered architect, New York State Licensed Engineer.

Member New York Association of Mechanical Engineers and American, Society of Civil Engineers.

Completed 2 years architecture, Columbia University; 5 years Civil Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn.

Draftsman to chief draftsman and engineer, New York City, on the architectural and engineering design of markets, industrial and office buildings, 1910-1917.

Lieutenant, Transportation Corps., assigned to construction headquarters staff under General W.W. Atterbury, on the design and construction of clocks and railway facilities in France, 1917-1920.

Served six months with the American Peace commission.

Superintendent and field engineer with Warren, Moore and Co., Philadelphia, on the construction of reinforced concrete factory buildings, 1920-1922.

Estimating, James S. Simpson and Co,, general construction of office, industrial and bank buildings, 1922-1925.

Engineer in charge of Charter Construction Co., New York; took part in designing, estimating, awarding contracts, and constructing apartments houses, hotels, and churches, 1925-1927.

Engineer in charge of Boston office, J. Gescheidt and Co.

Participated in designing, awarding contracts and general supervising of special buildings for Paramount, Metro Goldwyn Mayer, and Twentieth Century Fox Movie Corporations, 1927-1933.

President, R. L. Senior Inc., engineers and builders. Work involved construction, design, and alteration of all types of buildings, 1931-1941.

Acted as expert witness on criminal negligence, case, ceretiorari proceedings, deficiency judgments and arbitration suits.

Participated in war construction including two years as general superintendent on the construction of U. S. Naval Base in Northern Ireland, British Isles.

Was division manager, U, S. Naval Base, Davisville, RI, for 3 years; in charge of equipment, receiving and exporting building materials to advance naval base.

At present, superintendent on construction of steel and concrete structure for the Country Life Press Corp., Garden City, N. Y.

BIOGRAPHY OF ISRAEL RAFKIND
(Comptroller, American Community Builders Inc.)

Born June 12, 1911, Sheboygan, Wis.

Attended New York University School of Commerce; graduated January 1936 from the University of Wisconsin - Phi Beta Kappa.

Was comptroller for the Federal Public Housing Authority in Region II covering states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland.

Held the following governmental positions:

Assistant director, FPHA Budget Division

Chief, FPHA Management Budget Section

Assistant to the Budget Officer, National Housing Agency

Assistant to the Director, Bureau of Accounts and Audits, Social Security Board.

Secretary, Committee on Public Welfare Accounting, American Public Welfare Association.

Consultant and research staff member, Municipal Finance Officers Association and the National Committee on Municipal Accounting.

Author of numerous articles, pamphlets and books on municipal finance, etc.

BIOGRAPHY OF LOUIS J. FOGEL
(Chief Accountant Construction, American Community Builders, Inc.)

Born in Chicago, Illinois, 1900.

Attended Northwestern University.

Served in World War I, Navy - 1918-1921.

Organized own business - Real Estate, Niesen & Fogel.

Office Manager of Metropolitan Securities Corporation, Real Estate Financing.

Accountant, George Sollett Construction Company, Great Lakes, Illinois. (Hospital Units)

Chief Accountant, Office Manager, Paymaster - Sollett, Lancaster, White, Ottumwa, Iowa, U.S. Naval Air Station.

Accountant, Stewart Warner Corporation, in charge government machinery and accounts, R.F.C. Office of Defence Plants.

Commander Diversey Post 869, American Legion.

BIOGRAPHY OF EVERETT W. COLPITTS
(Purchasing Agent, American Community Builders, Inc.)

Born in Somerville, Mass., 1916.

Graduated from Boston University College of Business Administration, 1939, B.S. in Business Administration.

General Line Salesman for Wheeling Corrugating Company (Sheet, Steel and Wire Products), 1939-1941.

Served on active duty as 2nd Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 1941-1942.

Assistant Public Relations Officer & Recreation Officer, Fort Devens, Mass.

Cost Accountant with Saco Lowell Shops, Biddeford, Maine; in charge of costing sub-contracts on war work, 1942.

Purchasing Agent for Contractors NO. 8173 & 8175, Chicago, Illinois, (Syndicate of Contractors engaged in procurement of construction equipment and materials for U.S. Navy Department., Bureau of Yards & Docks, Advance Base Division) in charge of department covering Waterfront Equipment, Pontoons, Building Materials and Prefabricated Buildings, 1943-1946.

Purchasing Agent for General Fabricating Construction Company, New York City - in charge of all procurement for FPHA project converting Army barracks at Camp Shanks, New York, to dwelling units for World War II veterans, 1946-1947.